Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

How to test body pH balance: A pathway to alkaline stability

Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

The first step in establishing an alkaline diet is to test your current body pH balance. A good approximation of tissue pH is easily obtained by testing the pH of your first-morning urine.

pH test strips are available here or through other online resources. Complete instructions on how to use them come with the strips, but these are the simple steps to follow to test your body pH balance at home.

Steps to test your body pH

1. Obtain pH test paper. This paper measures the acid-alkaline state of any liquid. Readings at the low end of the scale indicate an acidic state, and those on the higher end a more alkaline state.

2. Test in the morning . First thing in the morning, if possible after 6 hours of sleep without getting up to urinate, get a test strip or tear off a three-inch piece of paper from the roll.

Either urinate directly on the paper or collect urine in a cup and dip the paper into the urine in the cup. Please note that first-morning urine is the most valuable pH reading according to our research.

If you can’t go 6 hours without getting up to urinate, then just test the first urine in the morning when you get up for the day.

3. Read the result color. As the test paper is moistened, it will take on a color. The color relates to the acid or alkaline state of your urine and ranges from yellow to dark blue. Match the color of your test strip with the chart provided on the back of your test kit.

  • A number below 6.5 means that your urine is on the acid side. The lower the number, the more acidic the condition.
  • The ideal urine reading should be between 6.5 to 7.5.

Tips if your reading is not in the ideal zone

Readings below 6.5:

At first, most people will have low pH readings due to the acid-forming tendency of the standard American diet. In this case, increase your intake of vegetables, fruits, root crops, nuts, seeds and spices, striving to get 80% of your nutrition from these alkalizing foods. You can find more details on the acid or alkaline forming nature of the various foods in The Acid-Alkaline Food Guide.

Readings above 7.5:

A highly alkaline reading is ly due to catabolism, the process of breakdown of body tissue which triggers excess nitrogen in the urine. If you are consistently getting readings at 8.0, contact your health professional about how to stimulate the repair state to reverse this catabolic cycle.

Be patient and persistent. Remember, your pH indicates your reserve of alkaline minerals. It can take time to build up these reserves. Do not be discouraged with a slow movement towards the ideal alkaline measurement. It may have taken decades to get where you are; a few months to sustained repair and renewal are well worth the effort and attention.

Monitor your body pH balance over time

You do not have to measure your pH every day, but it is an excellent idea to keep some record of your pH test results over time. At the Center for Better Bones we use a Monthly pH Testing Record.

You might want to use this chart yourself.

As you incorporate our Alkaline for Life® Eating Program, and as you use supplements ours which alkalize, you will see your pH reading move into the desired range.

pH Balance and Your Bones…

It’s not easy to tell what condition your bones are in at any given time. The only real outward signals that your bones may be weakening are receding gums, weak or broken teeth, and muscle loss—and even those signs don’t necessarily indicate how much bone you’ve lost, if any.

That’s why a pH test is so important for bone health. Testing your body pH will give you a sense of whether your body is tending toward metabolic acidity, or is in the balanced, slightly alkaline state that’s necessary for healthy bones. This test is relatively simple and can be done in your own home.

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Source: https://www.betterbones.com/alkaline-balance/ph-testing/

Urine pH

Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

Urine pH is used to classify urine as either a dilute acid or base solution. Seven is the point of neutrality on the pH scale. The lower the pH, the greater the acidity of a solution; the higher the pH, the greater the alkalinity.

The glomerular filtrate of blood is usually acidified by the kidneys from a pH of approximately 7.4 to a pH of about 6 in the urine. Depending on the person's acid-base status, the pH of urine may range from 4.5 to 8.

The kidneys maintain normal acid-base balance primarily through the reabsorption of sodium and the tubular secretion of hydrogen and ammonium ions. Urine becomes increasingly acidic as the amount of sodium and excess acid retained by the body increases.

Alkaline urine, usually containing bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer, is normally excreted when there is an excess of base or alkali in the body. Secretion of an acid or alkaline urine by the kidneys is one of the most important mechanisms the body uses to maintain a constant body pH.

A highly acidic urine pH occurs in:

  • Acidosis
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Diarrhea
  • Starvation and dehydration
  • Respiratory diseases in which carbon dioxide retention occurs and acidosis develops

A highly alkaline urine occurs in:

  • Urinary tract obstruction
  • Pyloric obstruction
  • Salicylate intoxication
  • Renal tubular acidosis
  • Chronic renal failure
  • Respiratory diseases that involve hyperventilation (blowing off carbon dioxide and the development of alkalosis)

In people who are not vegetarians, the pH of urine tends to be acidic. A diet rich in citrus fruits, legumes, and vegetables raises the pH and produces urine that is more alkaline.

Most of the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections make the urine more alkaline because the bacteria split urea into ammonia and other alkaline waste products. The urine pH varies in different types of acidosis and alkalosis.

Control of pH is important in the management of several diseases, including bacteriuria, renal calculi, and drug therapy.

The formation of renal stones is related to the urine pH. Patients being treated for renal calculi are frequently given diets or medications to change the pH of the urine so that kidney stones will not form. Calcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, and magnesium phosphate stones develop in alkaline urine; when this occurs, the urine is kept acidic.

Uric acid, cystine, and calcium oxalate stones precipitate in acidic urine; in this situation, the urine should be kept alkaline or less acidic than normal. Drugs such as streptomycin, neomycin, and kanamycin are effective in treating urinary tract infections if the urine is alkaline.

During treatment with sulfa drugs, alkaline urine helps prevent formation of sulfonamide crystals.

Here are important points to remember about urinary pH:

  • An accurate measurement of urinary pH can be done only on a freshly voided specimen. If urine must be kept for any length of time before analysis, it should be refrigerated.
  • During sleep, decreased pulmonary ventilation causes respiratory acidosis. As a result, a first waking urine specimen is usually highly acidic.
  • Bacteria causing a urinary tract infection or bacterial contamination will produce alkaline urine.
  • A diet rich in citrus fruits, most vegetables, and legumes will keep the urine alkaline.
  • A diet high in meat and cranberry juice will keep the urine acidic.
  • Urine pH is an important screening test for the diagnosis of renal disease, respiratory disease, and certain metabolic disorders.
  • If urine pH is to be useful, it is necessary to use pH information in comparison with other diagnostic information.

Instant Feedback:

Most bacterial urinary tract infections cause the urine to become more alkaline.

TRUEorFALSE

Source: https://www.rnceus.com/ua/uaph.html

Urine pH test

Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

A urine pH test measures the level of acid in urine.

The female and male urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

Some types of kidney stones are more prone to develop in alkaline urine and others are more ly to from in acidic urine. Monitoring the urine pH may be helpful in preventing the formation of kidney stones.

The male and female urinary tracts are relatively the same except for the length of the urethra.

After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The color change on the dipstick tells the provider the level of acid in your urine.

If needed, the provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours. Your provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate.

Your provider may tell you to stop taking certain medicines that can affect the results of the test. These may include:

  • Acetazolamide
  • Ammonium chloride
  • Methenamine mandelate
  • Potassium citrate
  • Sodium bicarbonate
  • Thiazide diuretic

DO NOT stop taking any medicine before talking to your provider.

Eat a normal, balanced diet for several days before the test. Note that:

  • A diet high in fruits, vegetables, or non-cheese dairy products can increase your urine pH.
  • A diet high in fish, meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH.

The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort.

Your provider may order this test to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to see if you:

  • Are at risk of kidney stones. Different types of stones can form depending on how acidic your urine is.
  • Need to take certain medicines to treat urinary tract infections. Some medicines are more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

The normal values range from pH 4.6 to 8.0.

The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

A high urine pH may be due to:

  • Kidneys that do not properly remove acids (kidney tubular acidosis, also known as renal tubular acidosis)
  • Kidney failure
  • Stomach pumping (gastric suction)
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Vomiting

A low urine pH may be due to:

There are no risks with this test.

Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30.

Fogazzi GB, Garigali G. Urinalysis. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 4.

Remer T, Manz F. Potential renal acid load of foods and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc. 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7797810.

Riley RS, McPherson RA. Basic examination of urine. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 28.

Last reviewed on: 7/15/2017

Reviewed by: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

Source: https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/tests/urine-ph-test

How the Test is Performed

After you provide a urine sample, it is tested right away. The health care provider uses a dipstick made with a color-sensitive pad. The color change on the dipstick tells the provider the level of acid in your urine.

If needed, the provider may ask you to collect your urine at home over 24 hours. Your provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly so that the results are accurate.

How to Prepare for the Test

Your provider may tell you to stop taking certain medicines that can affect the results of the test. These may include:

  • Acetazolamide
  • Ammonium chloride
  • Methenamine mandelate
  • Potassium citrate
  • Sodium bicarbonate
  • Thiazide diuretic

DO NOT stop taking any medicine before talking to your provider.

Eat a normal, balanced diet for several days before the test. Note that:

  • A diet high in fruits, vegetables, or non-cheese dairy products can increase your urine pH.
  • A diet high in fish, meat products, or cheese can decrease your urine pH.

How the Test will Feel

The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort.

Why the Test is Performed

Your provider may order this test to check for changes in your urine acid levels. It may be done to see if you:

  • Are at risk of kidney stones. Different types of stones can form depending on how acidic your urine is.
  • Need to take certain medicines to treat urinary tract infections. Some medicines are more effective when urine is acidic or non-acidic (alkaline).

Normal Results

The normal values range from pH 4.6 to 8.0.

The examples above are common measurements for results of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

A high urine pH may be due to:

  • Kidneys that do not properly remove acids (kidney tubular acidosis, also known as renal tubular acidosis)
  • Kidney failure
  • Stomach pumping (gastric suction)
  • Urinary tract infection
  • Vomiting

A low urine pH may be due to:

  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Diarrhea
  • Too much acid in the body fluids (metabolic acidosis), such as diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Starvation

References

Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 30.

Fogazzi GB, Garigali G. Urinalysis. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege J, eds. Comprehensive Clinical Nephrology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 4.

Remer T, Manz F. Potential renal acid load of foods and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc. 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7797810.

Riley RS, McPherson RA. Basic examination of urine. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 23rd ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 28.

Review Date: 07/15/2017

Source: https://www.ucsfhealth.org/medical-tests/003583

Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

Urine pH can help your doctor diagnose certain diseases and disorders and can also tell you a lot about your diet. Urine pH is important when it comes to monitoring your risk of kidney stones, as extreme pH levels can cause stones to form. Read on to see what urine pH can reveal about your health and what you can do to improve your levels.

What is Urine pH?

pH is a measure of how acidic or alkaline (basic) a fluid is. A pH of 7 is considered neutral. Below 7 fluids are acidic, while above 7 they are alkaline.

Every fluid in the body has a unique pH range that is optimal for health. For example, blood pH is usually maintained in a tight range between 7.35 and 7.45. Even a slight increase or decrease in blood pH can be dangerous. Saliva normally has a pH range of 6.2-7.6, which neutralizes acids in foods and prevents bad bacteria from growing [1, 2, 3].

The kidneys help keep the blood pH from going too low or too high by filtering acids or alkaline compounds (bicarbonate) from the blood and releasing them in the urine. That’s why the urine has a wider pH range compared to both blood and saliva. The normal range of urine pH is between 4.5 and 8 [4, 5].

Diet, certain drugs, infections, and poor kidney function can all affect the pH of urine. For example, diets high in protein from meat, fish, dairy, and grains can decrease urine pH (more acidic), whereas diets high in fruits and vegetables can increase urine pH (more alkaline) [6, 7, 8].

Urine pH Testing

Urine pH is tested as part of a routine urinalysis. It is often used to assess the risk of kidney stones, help diagnose urinary tract infections (UTIs), or determine the effectiveness of some antibiotics and other drugs that can be affected by urine pH [9, 10, 11].

Dipstick vs. Electrode

Urine pH can be measured using a dipstick, which is a test strip that is placed in a urine sample and reveals the pH depending on how the color of the strip changes.

The advantages of dipstick measurements include convenience, cost, and the ability to test pH at home. However, they are not as accurate as an electrode measurement and studies suggest they shouldn’t be used for clinical decision-making [12, 13].

The gold standard of measuring urine pH is a pH meter that uses an electrode. It is much more accurate, however, it is also more expensive [12].

Fasting vs. Spot vs. 24-Hour Test

For a routine urinalysis, a urine sample is provided after an overnight fast. This is referred to as a fasting urine sample. A morning sample is usually more alkaline [14].

A spot urine sample is a random sample taken during the day.

Urine pH is known to change throughout the day, peaking in the middle of the day, and decreasing after each meal. To get an accurate measurement of the average urine pH throughout the day, 24-hour urine tests are used [15].

Fasting and single-spot samples are not accurate enough to assess and treat people with kidney stones [16, 14].

Normal Urine pH levels

Lab results are commonly shown as a set of values known as a “reference range”, which is sometimes referred to as a “normal range”. A reference range includes the upper and lower limits of a lab test a group of otherwise healthy people.

Your healthcare provider will compare your lab test results with reference values to see if any of your results fall outside the range of expected values. By doing so, you and your healthcare provider can gain clues to help identify possible conditions or diseases.

The normal range for urine pH is between 4.5 and 8 [4, 5]. Urine pH is slightly more alkaline in the morning than at night. Women also tend to have slightly higher urine pH levels than men [14, 17, 18].

Improper storage conditions (high temperatures) before analysis can result in urine pH levels above 9, so if you see levels that are abnormally high you may want to retest to be sure [19].

Factors that Can Decrease Urine pH

Causes shown below are commonly associated with this low urine pH. Work with your doctor or other health care professional for an accurate diagnosis.

1) Diet

Food is one of the most important factors in determining the pH of urine. Meat, fish, dairy, and grains all increase the number of acids that the kidney has to filter into the urine. Most vegetables and fruits (especially citrus) generate alkaline compounds, reducing the number of acids the kidneys must filter [20].

A study in over 22k people has shown that high fruit and vegetable intake and lower consumption of meat were linked to a more alkaline urine [8].

Protein increases the amount of acid produced in the body. Kidneys have to filter these acids into the urine, decreasing its pH. Three studies with a total of 89 people revealed that high protein diets make the urine more acidic [21, 22, 23].

Two studies with 18 and 26 people, respectively, reported that people who ate a diet high in meat and protein over three days saw their urine pH drop, while those who ate a diet high in vegetables and fruits and low in meats saw their urine pH increase [24, 25].

2) Diarrhea

Diarrhea causes a loss of electrolytes, thereby reducing blood pH (i.e. making it more acidic). The kidneys then compensate for this by releasing more acids in the urine [26].

A study in 24 people reported that diarrhea reduced urine pH from 6.7 to 5.5 on average [26].

3) High Blood Sugar and Diabetes

High blood sugar causes insulin resistance. This causes the kidneys to produce less ammonia, a compound that increases the pH of the urine [27].

In a study of 5k people, higher blood sugar levels were associated with lower urine pH. Similarly, another study of 1k people found that those with urine pH below 5.5 also tended to have the highest degree of insulin resistance [28, 29].

Conversely, in a five-year-long observational study of 3.1k people those with a urine pH lower than 5.5 had a 2.5 times higher risk of developing diabetes than those who’s urine pH was above 6.5 [30].

3) Poor Kidney Function

Studies suggest that people with impaired kidney function or kidney disease may have lower urine pH [31, 32].

Mercury, for example, is a toxin that damages the kidneys [33]. In a study of 200 workers who were constantly exposed to mercury, urine pH decreased with kidney dysfunction and increasing levels of mercury in the urine [34].

4) Acid/Base Disorders

When there are acid/base disorders in the body that turn blood more acidic (e.g. diabetic ketoacidosis, respiratory acidosis, rhabdomyolysis), kidneys try to compensate by increasing the excretion of acids in urine, thereby turning the urine more acidic [35, 36].

5) Certain Drugs

Some drugs, such as water pills (diuretics) can make the urine more acidic [37, 38, 39].

6) Genes

While urine pH is largely dependent on external factors such as diet and health conditions, studies suggest that genes also play their part [40, 41]. You can find more information about particular genes and SNPs that have been associated with urine pH at the bottom of this article.

1) Kidney Stones

Low urine pH facilitates the formation of kidney stones. Acidic urine causes uric acid and calcium oxalate to clump together and form stones. This effect is seen with pH levels below 5.5 [25, 42, 24, 43, 44, 45].

2) Obesity and Excess Body Weight

Obesity and high BMI are linked to an increased risk of kidney stones. This may be due to reduced urine pH in obese and overweight people [46].

A study in 460 men with kidney stones reported that higher BMI was associated with a lower urine pH levels [47].

Similarly, in a study of 342 people, urine pH was lower in obese and overweight people compared to normal body weight individuals [48].

However, a larger study with 13,895 men found a link between urine pH below 5.5 and obesity in men, but not in women [49].

Metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by at least three of the following five features: high blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess stomach fat, high triglycerides, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-C).

In a study of 5.4k people, those with metabolic syndrome had lower urine pH than those without it. People with a urine pH below 5.5 were 50% more ly to have metabolic syndrome than those with a pH above 6 [50].

Additionally, in a three-year-long study with 14.5k healthy people, having a urine pH below 5.5 was linked to a 48% increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome compared to a pH above 6 [51].

There are several other studies that also found a link between metabolic syndrome and its components and lower urine pH levels [52, 53, 49].

4) Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a buildup of fat in the liver due to causes other than excessive alcohol (diet, infections, drugs).

In a study of 1k people, a urine pH below 5.5 was associated with a higher lihood of having NAFLD compared to a pH above 5.5 [54].

Another study of 98 people found that a urine pH below 6 was linked to fatty buildup in the liver [53].

5) Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

In a study of 1.8k people, those with urine pH between 5 and 5.5 had a 32% higher risk of developing advanced chronic kidney disease over the next 8 years [55].

6) Bladder Cancer

A study in over 700 bladder cancer patients and 611 controls found a link between bladder cancer and lower pH (C)

  • rs145048940 (C>A)
  • rs34447434 (A>C)
  • rs17761305 (T>C)
  • rs28623722 (G>A)
  • rs28370990 (T>C)
  • rs17183073 (C>G)
  • rs768831 (A>G)
  • rs1713968 (A>G)
  • rs116189043 (A>G)
  • rs1611781 (G>A)
  • rs6554409 (C>T)
  • rs1713961 (C>T)
  • rs1718883 (T>A)
  • rs7670536 (T>C)
  • rs1713962 (G>A)
  • rs1718874 (C>T)
  • rs1713967 (T>A)
  • rs1718873 (C>T)
  • rs13107451 (A>G)
  • rs11726321 (C>T)
  • rs77053948 (G>A)
  • rs1718834 (T>C)
  • rs1718872 (C>G)
  • rs6817232 (G>C)
  • Polycystic kidney disease is a genetic disorder that causes low urine pH and is caused by the PKHD1 gene and mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 genes [80].

    Genes that have been Associated with Renal Tubular Acidosis

    Renal tubular acidosis, which results in alkaline urine, has been associated with mutations in the following genes [41+]:

    • SLC4A4
    • SLC4A1
    • CA2
    • MLR
    • SNCC1B
    • SCNN1G
    • SNCC1A
    • WNK1
    • WNK4
    • ATP6N1B
    • ATP6B1

    Source: https://selfhacked.com/blog/urine-ph/

    Effect of a novel dietary supplement on pH levels of healthy volunteers: a pilot study

    Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

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    Why pH Regulation is So Important For a Healthy Pregnancy

    Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

    Your body’s potential hydrogen (pH or “acid-base balance”) level directly impacts your overall health and even a woman’s fertility. The pH scale ranges from zero (highly acidic) to 14 (very basic). A pH of seven is considered neutral, so pH regulation for pregnant women is extremely important.

    Blood or urine tests determine your body’s pH level, which hovers between 7.3 to 7.4 in healthy individuals. Just about everything can change your blood’s pH level-breathing fresh or polluted air, eating certain foods, stress and illness.

    Most people suffering imbalanced pH levels (zero to five) are too acidic. An overly acidic pH forces your body to “borrow” potassium, sodium, calcium, and other minerals from bones and organs to help neutralize acid and eliminate it from the body through sweat and urine.

    Mild to moderate acidosis may promote high blood pressure, heart problems, osteoporosis, diabetes, obesity, and kidney stones. Hormone production in both men and women can be affected by mild acidosis since the ovaries and testes are losing minerals due to acidic pH.

    Alternately, a low pH level (alkalosis) is less common than acidosis. Symptoms of alkalosis include nausea, numbness in your fingers, hands, feet, hand tremors, muscle twitching, and muscle spasms.

    Treatment for High or Low pH Levels

    Treatment for an imbalanced pH involves making changes to your diet, increasing physical activity, drinking more water, and more intensive treatments to improve seriously low or high pH levels.

    These treatments include raising pH with intravenously administered sodium bicarbonate, taking sodium citrate to improve kidney functioning, and restoring electrolyte imbalance with special fluids.

    How Does pH Affect Fertility?

    Sperm must travel through the vagina and the cervical canal before reaching the fallopian tubes to fertilize an egg. An imbalanced pH level in the cervix or vagina can damage sperm enough to prevent it from fertilizing an egg. The most ideal vaginal pH level for a woman to have who wants to get pregnant is between 3.

    8 and 4.5. outside the days she is ovulating. During ovulating, surges in luteinizing hormone are meant to maintain a pH level optimal to increase the chance that sperm reaches the egg. In fact, when the vaginal pH level is between seven and 12, sperm can survive as long as 48 hours within the female reproductive system.

    What Affects The Acidity Of Cervical And Vaginal Fluids?

    In addition to stress, diet, or being overweight, the pH of a woman’s vagina and cervix may be imbalanced due to age, dehydration, taking certain prescription drugs, living in urban areas where air quality is regularly poor, and using lubricants harmful to sperm.

    At Viera Fertility Clinic in Melbourne, we typically discover the reason for imbalanced pH in women trying to conceive is her diet. Processed food, sugary drinks, burgers and anything containing white flour or white sugar are considered highly acidic foods. In addition, a diet consisting primarily of junk food may cause hormonal problems that negatively impact female fertility.

    Finding Out If Your pH Levels Are Interfering with Fertility

    Viera Fertility Clinic provides comprehensive fertility testing for women and men who are having difficulty conceiving. In addition to semen analysis, hormone and ovulation tests, and pelvic ultrasounds, we also perform pH testing of vaginal and cervical fluids.

    If we find imbalanced pH levels, we typically recommend eating more foods to help reduce acidity (apples, bananas, oranges, tomatoes, yogurt, almonds, sunflower seeds) or possibly taking nutritional supplements to restore a healthy pH balance to the vagina and cervix.

    High estrogen-low progesterone levels, a condition called “estrogen dominance, can also make pH levels toxic to sperm.

    Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are at risk of suffering from estrogen dominance and might have difficulty conceiving.

    At our Melbourne fertility clinic, we test serum hormone levels and provide treatment for women with estrogen dominance or PCOS to help increase their chances of getting pregnant.

    When pH Regulation isn’t Causing Your Infertility

    Assisted reproductive technologies such as IVF and IUI are just a few options for women wanting to have a baby but cannot conceive naturally. Our fertility clinic in Melbourne can help you and your partner achieve pregnancy using advanced testing, technologies, and minimally invasive procedures. Contact us today to schedule a consultation appointment.

    Source: https://www.vierafertility.com/blog/why-ph-regulation-is-so-important-for-a-healthy-pregnancy/

    Urine pH: Normal ranges and what they mean

    Urine pH Testing: High & Low Levels + How to Improve

    Urine comprises water, salts, and waste products from the kidneys. The balance of these compounds can affect the urine’s acidity levels, which specialists measure in pH.

    The pH is the measurement of how acidic or alkaline a person’s urine is. Doctors often test the urine pH, and they may perform other diagnostic tests, when a person has symptoms that may be related to a problem in the urinary tract.

    According to the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the average value for urine pH is 6.0, but it can range from 4.5 to 8.0. Urine under 5.0 is acidic, and urine higher than 8.0 is alkaline, or basic.

    Different laboratories may have different ranges for “normal” pH levels. The laboratory report will explain the normal and abnormal levels for the specific laboratory. A doctor will usually explain these results to the person.

    One of the major factors affecting urine pH is the food that a person eats. A doctor will ly ask a person about the foods they typically eat before evaluating their urine pH results.

    Acidic foods include:

    • grains
    • fish
    • sodas
    • high-protein foods
    • sugary foods

    Alkaline foods include:

    • nuts
    • vegetables
    • most fruits

    If a person has a high urine pH, meaning that it is more alkaline, it might signal a medical condition such as:

    • kidney stones
    • urinary tract infections (UTIs)
    • kidney-related disorders

    A person can also have a higher urine pH due to prolonged vomiting. This rids the body of stomach acid, which can make body fluids more basic.

    Acidic urine can also create an environment where kidney stones can form.

    If a person has low urine pH, meaning that it is more acidic, it might indicate a medical condition such as:

    Taking certain medications can also make a person’s urine pH more basic or acidic.

    A person should ask their doctor if they should stop taking certain medications the night or morning of a urinalysis. However, sometimes a doctor will want a person to continue taking these medications to determine a person’s urine pH while they are taking them.

    Because many factors affect urine pH, and because it can vary greatly, a doctor cannot diagnose a medical condition pH alone. For instance, a pH of over 7 could signal a UTI or a different kind of infection.

    A doctor may consider urine pH along with other symptoms to make a diagnosis. They may also order a urine pH test to study the effectiveness of kidney stone treatments.

    Medications such as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (acetazolamide) aim to make urine more alkaline, so a doctor may take more than one sample to see whether the pH is changing.

    Sometimes, a doctor may ask for a “clean-catch” urine sample to prevent bacteria from entering the sample. This means that a person will clean their genital area, release a small amount of urine, and collect 1–2 ounces of urine for pH testing.

    A urinalysis has three major components:

    • Visual exam: When a doctor or laboratory technician examines the urine, they will look at its color, whether foreign material such as blood is present in the urine, and whether the urine appears foamy.
    • Dipstick test: A dipstick test involves holding a piece of specially treated paper, or litmus paper, in a urine sample. The dipstick will change color to show how acidic or alkaline the urine is. It may also change color if other substances, such as glucose, white blood cells, bilirubin, or proteins, are present in the urine.
    • Microscopic exam: A laboratory technician will examine a small amount of urine under a microscope to look for particles, such as red blood cells, crystals, or white blood cells. These are not usually present in the urine and can indicate an underlying medical condition.

    A urine pH test does not cause side effects. A person will urinate as they normally would to provide the sample.

    The acidity or alkalinity of urine can help a doctor diagnose medical conditions. Doctors can test urine pH using a litmus paper test.

    A doctor can perform a urine pH test as part of a larger urinalysis test, or a they can specifically test urine pH.

    High and low pH levels can indicate problems with a person’s kidneys, such as an environment that could help kidney stones develop.

    Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323957

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