Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

Contents
  1. Side Effects & Benefits Of Malic Acid
  2. Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects
  3. What is Malic Acid?
  4. Food Sources
  5. Proponents
  6. Skeptics
  7. Dry Mouth
  8. Insufficient Evidence For:
  9. Skin Care
  10. Fibromyalgia
  11. Cognition
  12. Kidney Stones
  13. Digestion
  14. Malic Acid in Food
  15. Malic Acid in Supplements
  16. Topical Malic Acid
  17. Drug Interactions
  18. Supplementation
  19. Forms
  20. Dosage
  21. Malic Acid Benefits Energy Levels, Skin Health & More
  22. Is malic acid natural?
  23. Is malic acid good for your skin?
  24. What does malic acid do for health?
  25. What Is Malic Acid?
  26. Is malic acid sour?
  27. What does malic acid do for the body?
  28. What is malic acid used for?
  29. What is the most common acid added to food?
  30. 1. General Energy Enhancer
  31. 2. Helps Treat Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
  32. 3. Promotes Better Exercise Performance
  33. 4. Helps Common Skin Concerns ( Wrinkles and Breakouts)
  34. 5. Improves Oral Health
  35. 6. Boosts Iron Absorption
  36. Is malic acid bad for you?
  37. Is malic acid good for gallstones?
  38. Does malic acid raise blood sugar?
  39. Does malic acid help weight loss?
  40. Do lemons have malic acid?
  41. What to Look for in Malic Acid Products
  42. What’s the difference between L-malic acid and DL-malic acid?
  43. Supplement Dosage and Preparation
  44. Is malic acid soluble in water?
  45. Final Thoughts
  46. Malic Acid | What Is It, Benefits, Side Effects & Uses
  47. Where Can You Find Malic Acid?
  48. Benefits of Malic Acid
  49. What is it the doctor says about having an apple every day?
  50. This isn’t the only alpha-hydroxy acid used to treat skin
  51. Side Effects
  52. MALIC ACID
  53. Malic Acid – Health Benefits, Dosage & Side Effects
  54. Table Of Contents
  55. What Are The Benefits Of Malic Acid?
  56. 1. Treats Fibromyalgia And CFS
  57. 2. Boosts Oral Health
  58. 3. Improves Liver Health
  59. 4. Can Treat Gout
  60. 5. Good During Pregnancy
  61. 6. Can Aid Weight Loss
  62. 7. Can Make Your Skin Flawless
  63. 8. Can Boost Hair Health
  64. What Are The Foods Rich In Malic Acid?
  65. What Is The Recommended Dosage Of Malic Acid?
  66. Conclusion
  67. Expert’s Answers For Readers’ Questions
  68. Related

Side Effects & Benefits Of Malic Acid

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

Malic acid — or in its ionized form, malate — is an organic compound that occurs naturally in a variety of fruits and vegetables. It can also be synthesized in the body as part of aerobic and anaerobic energy cycles.

If you're exposed to malic acid in your work environment, your concerns are different than someone who takes it as a supplement. Credit: karandaev/iStock/GettyImages

You'll find malic acid naturally present in numerous fruits and vegetables, including apples, apricots, mangoes, strawberries, pineapples, grapes, lettuce, onions, celery, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and more.

Because malic acid is a naturally occurring compound in common foods, it's generally considered safe for human consumption — and as the Toxicology Data Network notes, it's often added to processed foods, including baked goods, frozen dairy, soft candy and nonalcoholic beverages.

However, the TDN also notes a scattering of adverse complaints from a test of malic acid and magnesium in the treatment of fibromyalgia. The complaints included nausea, dyspepsia and diarrhea, and it's not clear if they were ever tied directly to the malic acid and magnesium supplements or not.

If you're exposed to malic acid in your work environment, your concerns are different than someone who takes it as a supplement. The Toxicology Data Network classifies malic acid as strongly irritating to the skin, and especially an irritant to the eyes. It also considers inhalation of malic acid to present a risk.

Malic acid on its own hasn't been the object of much scientific interest. However, because malic acid is a natural intermediate product of your body's energy cycles, it sometimes crops up as part of compounds being evaluated as treatments for fibromyalgia or to boost sports performance.

However, the evidence of malic acid's efficacy on all fronts is, at best, uncertain. Of particular note, a data analysis published in the May 2019 issue of Medwave, concludes that a combination of magnesium and malic acid made little or no difference in the pain and depressive symptoms of patients with fibromyalgia.

However, not all studies confirm that. As the Huntington College of Health Sciences notes in another summary of research, fibromyalgia patients have shown rapid improvement in pain levels after 48 hours of supplementation with 1,200 to 2,400 mg of malic acid plus magnesium, and then lost that improvement after they stopped taking the malic acid.

As noted by National Institutes of Health, malic acid is often combined with citrulline as an athletic supplement ⁠— on the theory that because malate is an intermediate product of your body's energy cycles, boosting its levels may also boost your energy levels or sports performance.

However, despite malic acid's ubiquity for this purpose, there is no conclusive proof that it's effective. Of particular note, a small study of nine subjects, published in the October 2017 issue of Nutrients, showed that taking citrulline malate — a mix of malic acid and citrulline — did not improve muscle recovery after resistance exercise.

There are, of course, a number of caveats to consider in that study, not least the very small sample size and the fact that the subjects weren't accustomed to exercise; it's possible that bodies that are better adapted to exercise might show different responses.

Ultimately, more research is definitely needed to prove or disprove any of malic acid's purported benefits.

And in the meantime, if you're taking malic acid for a medical condition such as fibromyalgia, always talk to your doctor first.

In the absence of clear guidelines for dosage, a doctor is your first line of defense in identifying possible contraindications and drug interactions for this and any other supplements.

Source: https://www.livestrong.com/article/40552-side-effects-benefits-malic/

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

In 1785, scientists discovered that malic acid is what gives apples their sour flavor. Today we know that malic acid is found in many foods and is naturally produced in the human body. Although it is mostly used as a flavor enhancer, malic acid has several purported health benefits as well. Read on to learn if science backs these claims.

What is Malic Acid?

Malic acid is an organic compound found in many fruits. It was first identified in apple juice and was named after the Latin word for apple, mālum [1].

Malic acid belongs to a family of compounds called alpha hydroxy acids (AHA). This group of acids is commonly used in cosmetic products that are purported to help with skin conditions, such as dry skin, wrinkles, and acne.

The human body also naturally produces malic acid, which can bind to other compounds to form malate. The body uses malate in chemical reactions to create the energy that powers our cells [2].

One of the major uses of malic acid is as a food additive to add a sour taste to foods and drinks. Malic acid is also popular as a supplement and is purported to have several benefits, helping with fibromyalgia and fatigue [3].

According to research, malic acid as a mouth spray may help dry mouth as well.

Food Sources

Although malic acid was first discovered in apples, a wide range of fruits contain this compound. This include grapes, mangos, pears, oranges, and many more. Products derived from fruits, apple juice and wine, will also contain malic acid [4, 5, 6].

Some vegetables rhubarb, celery, and carrots contain this acid as well [7].

The amount of malic acid in fruits and vegetables can vary. Researchers have found that wild apples contain higher levels compared to farmed apples. Levels can also depend on temperature, how the fruit is stored, and the age of the fruit [8, 9].

Manufacturers often add malic acid to foods and beverages as a flavor enhancer. Others use it to add a tart flavor to many food products, including candy, soda, and gum. Food grade malic acid powder is available for cooking and baking.

Proponents

  • Naturally found in food
  • May help with dry mouth
  • May help with skin conditions
  • May improve fatigue and pain associated with fibromyalgia

Skeptics

  • Lack of strong clinical research
  • May have drug interactions
  • May have side effects

Dry Mouth

Dry mouth is a common clinical problem. Various medications, radiation therapy, and dehydration can all cause this condition. Treating dry mouth is important – persistent dryness can lead to tooth decay and other oral health issues [10].

Three small clinical trials found that a malic acid 1% mouth spray may increase the production and flow of saliva. The studies suggest this mouth spray may reduce dry mouth caused by blood pressure medications and antidepressants as well as dry mouth in the elderly [11, 12, 13].

A different study with 70 patients also found that the spray may increase the flow of saliva, while also possibly improving oral health-related quality of life [14].

Finally, a systematic review of 26 studies suggests that a malic acid 1% mouth spray may be effective for dry mouth caused by medications [15].

Insufficient Evidence For:

The following purported benefits of malic acid are only supported by limited, low-quality clinical studies. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of malic acid for any of the uses listed below. Remember to speak with a doctor before taking malic acid supplements. Malic acid should never be used as a replacement for approved medical therapies.

Skin Care

Many cosmetic products contain small amounts of malic acid, where it is used to help balance pH levels. Some research has investigated the role of malic acid used topically, but the number of clinical studies is limited [16].

One study tested a specific skin cream called Hyseac AHA cream, which contains malic acid, in 248 patients with mild to moderate acne. According to the researchers, this cream may help improve acne [17].

A small study of 35 people suggests that skin care therapy that includes an iontophoresis mask, vitamin C, and malic acid may improve skin discoloration in those with melasma, a condition that leaves dark patches on the skin [18].

Fibromyalgia

According to a study with 24 patients, a supplement containing malic acid and magnesium may improve pain and tenderness associated with fibromyalgia, but only when taken for at least 6 months [19].

Cognition

A small study in Japan looked at the effects of a special milk protein drink that was acidified with malic and citric acid in 29 healthy young adult men. They found that the drink may improve cognition, performance on cognition tests [20].

Kidney Stones

One small study of 8 people reported that malic acid supplements may increase the excretion of citrate in the urine, which may be beneficial against kidney stones [21].

Digestion

Several animal studies suggest that malic acid supplements may help with nutrient digestion and milk production in cows. The effect of malic acid on human digestion is unknown [22, 23, 24].

Malic Acid in Food

Malic acid is considered ly safe when consumed in the amounts that are typically found in foods.

The FDA labels malic acid as a “food substance generally recognized as safe”. According to the FDA, it is appropriate as a flavor enhancer and ph control agent. As a food additive, there are specific limits on how much malic acid can be contained in food products [25].

Malic Acid in Supplements

Malic acid is considered only possibly safe when taken as an oral supplement due to a lack of safety research on the high doses contained in supplements.

The most commonly reported side effects of malic acid supplements are diarrhea and nausea. However, other side effects are possible, contact your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any other side effects [19].

Topical Malic Acid

There is insufficient evidence to determine if malic acid is safe when used topically on the skin. some reports, creams containing malic acid may cause skin irritation [26].

Drug Interactions

If you decide to take malic acid (or any other supplement) let your doctor know as there may be unexpected and potentially dangerous interactions with your other medications or health conditions. The drug interactions of malic acid are not well researched and there may be more potential interactions beyond the ones discussed here.

There is some evidence from animal research that malic acid may reduce blood pressure. This means that malic acid may have an additive effect with blood pressure-lowering medications, potentially reducing blood pressure too far. For this same reason, malic acid supplement use should be cautioned in those with hypotension (low blood pressure) [27].

Supplementation

In the following sections, we’ll discuss the common forms and dosages of malic acid supplements that are commercially available. Malic acid supplements have not been approved by the FDA for medical use. Regulations set manufacturing standards for them but don’t guarantee that they’re safe or effective. Speak with your doctor before supplementing.

Forms

Malic acid supplements are typically available as capsules or tablets and are sometimes combined with other nutrients magnesium. Depending on the manufacturer, these capsules can be vegan and gluten-free.

Skin care products may contain small amounts of malic acid and other, similar hydroxy acids. These products include lotions, creams, and face peel treatments.

Certain mouth sprays for dry mouth can contain a small amount of malic acid. Clinical trials examining these sprays have all used a specific mouth spray containing 1% malic acid.

Dosage

It is unclear what a safe and effective dose of malic acid is in most cases due to a lack of research.

For mouth sprays containing 1% malic acid, research participants usually used the mouth spray as needed, sometimes up to 8 times a day [15].

The dosage of malic acid supplements typically range from about 600 to 800 mg per capsule or tablet. Manufacturers usually recommend taking one capsule or tablet each day.

For topical forms of malic acid, it’s unclear what a proper dosage is.

Source: https://selfhacked.com/blog/malic-acid/

Malic Acid Benefits Energy Levels, Skin Health & More

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

As an organic compound, you can find malic acid in things that you ly eat often, such as apples. It’s also present in wine and several other food sources.

Is malic acid natural?

Yes, it can be naturally found in many kinds of fruits and vegetables.

You can also find it in supplements and skin care. In those cases, sometimes it’s natural, but sometimes it’s synthetic.

Is malic acid good for your skin?

It’s actually considered an alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), which is a group of acids that are often included skin care products for their skin-rejuvenating abilities.

AHAs are known to help a wide range of skin concerns, including wrinkles, dry skin and acne.

What does malic acid do for health?

The body uses it for energy production, which is why some people take it as a supplement for health concerns chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia. It’s also sometimes taken to enhance athletic performance.

But that’s not all! Read on to learn more about this interesting natural compound.

What Is Malic Acid?

Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish pharmacist, originally discovered this acid in apples in 1785. The name malic actually comes from the Latin name of apple, which is malum.

Apples are the No. 1 natural source. In fact, of an apple’s total acid content, over 90 percent is malic acid.

One malic acid definition is: a crystalline acid present in unripe apples and other fruits. The malic acid formula is C₄H₆O₅.

As you can see, malic acid structure is composed of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen.

Is malic acid sour?

Yes, it’s a tart-tasting organic acid, which is the reason why many natural foods have a sour or tart flavor. It’s also added to foods ( candy) to make them sour.

The human body also creates this acid.

What does malic acid do for the body?

It plays an important role in the Krebs cycle, which is an energy-producing sequence of reactions key to life.

What is malic acid used for?

There are many malic acid uses in both the food and cosmetic industry. In addition to its key role in the body, it’s also added to foods to make them tart and in cosmetics to adjust their acidity.

What is the most common acid added to food?

It’s probably citric acid, but malic is used a lot as well. If you compare malic acid vs. citric acid, there are a lot of similarities, but malic acid pH is a bit more acidic than citric acid pH.

malic, citric acid is also naturally found in vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. It’s also produced in living organisms during the Krebs cycle (which is also called the citric acid cycle).

Both malic and citric acid add tart flavor and act as preservatives.

Now, let’s take a look at potential malic acid benefits.

1. General Energy Enhancer

As mentioned earlier, malic acid is produced by the human body, and it’s a key player in the Krebs cycle. This cycle includes the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins and fatty acids to create adenosine triphosphate, more commonly known as simply ATP.

This complex complex organic chemical provides cellular energy for all living organisms on earth.

2. Helps Treat Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The combination of magnesium and malic acid is considered an alternative therapy for fibromyalgia, but more research is needed. Some research has pointed toward noticeable improvement in fibromyalgia symptoms after supplementing with magnesium malate.

Magnesium malate is also sometimes used for chronic fatigue syndrome.

What is malate? It’s a form of malic acid.

The main symptom of chronic fatigue syndrome or CFS is extreme fatigue. Fibromyalgia is another condition with fatigue as a main symptom.

Since malic acid plays an integral part in the energy-generating Krebs cycle that takes place in the human body, it makes some sense why some people choose to supplement with it for these conditions. However, there hasn’t been a great deal of research to date to support the use of malic acid supplements for these conditions.

3. Promotes Better Exercise Performance

As a supplement, malic acid is taken to boost athletic performance and discourage post-exercise muscle fatigue. Sometimes it’s taken in conjunction with creatine, a very popular supplement for people looking to increase lean muscle mass.

A study published in Acta Physiologica Hungarica in 2015 looked at the effects of a creatine malate supplement in long-distance runners as well as sprinters.

Following six weeks of supplementation along with physical training, the researchers observed a significant increase in growth hormone in the sprinter group, and both the sprinters and long-distance runners experienced a physical performance boost.

For the long-distance runners, there was a significant increase in how much distance they covered.

4. Helps Common Skin Concerns ( Wrinkles and Breakouts)

The use of this acid for skin care products is not uncommon. Due to its antioxidant and exfoliation benefits, it’s commonly used for a range of skin concerns, including fine lines and wrinkles, hyperpigmentation, acne, large pores, milia, warts, calluses, and more.

Sometimes it’s derived naturally, but it can also be synthetic or man-made too. It’s often combined with glycolic and lactic acids.

Malic acid is such an effective skin refiner because it encourages the shedding of the outer layer of skin cells. The shedding it promotes can have anti-aging effects since cell turnover slows as we age.

It’s also helpful for removing pore-clogging debris that can lead to acne.

5. Improves Oral Health

Some research demonstrates that this acid can improve symptoms of xerostomia (the fancy name for dry mouth) by stimulating saliva production in the mouth. Healthy saliva production also helps prevent the overgrowth of oral bacteria.

6. Boosts Iron Absorption

Everyone needs to get iron from the diet. Getting enough of this nutrient is especially important for pregnant women and people who struggle with anemia.

One study points out how vegetables rich in vitamin C as well as malic acid ( tomatoes and potatoes) are excellent choices if you’re looking to boost your iron absorption.

Is malic acid bad for you?

Consuming malic acid in food is generally regarded as safe and doesn’t cause any unwanted malic acid side effects.

On the other hand, consuming it as an additive, supplement or in any synthetic form may cause side effects. For example, excessive consumption of malic acid candy (typically sour candies) is known to possibly cause irritation of the mouth, throat or stomach.

In general, if you consume too much of anything containing added malic acid, it may irritate your mouth.

Possible side effects of a malic acid supplement may include stomach upset, diarrhea, nausea, headaches or allergic reactions.

When applied to the skin, it may cause skin or eye irritation. Discontinue use of a product containing this acid if you experience any unwanted side effects.

Taking it as a supplement or medicine is not recommended for pregnant or nursing women. Since it may lower blood pressure, it’s also not recommended for anyone prone to low blood pressure.

Is malic acid good for gallstones?

There is currently no research to support taking it for gallstones. However, eating fiber-rich whole foods fruits and vegetables that contain this acid is associated with a decreased risk of gallstones.

See your health care provider if you have symptoms of gallstones.

Does malic acid raise blood sugar?

While consuming too many fruits containing this acid can certainly raise blood sugar, this organic acid is not known for causing increased glucose levels. In fact, a recent scientific trial theorized that the malic and citric acids found in pomegranates are major reasons why this fruit can lower blood glucose responses both chronically and acutely.

Does malic acid help weight loss?

Some sources say it can help improve fat break down, but the benefit of weight loss is unclear at this time so talk to your doctor before using it for this purpose.

In general, check with your health care provider before supplementing with this acid, especially if you are being treated for a medical condition or are currently taking medication. Keep supplements the reach of children.

Do lemons have malic acid?

Yes, lemons and citrus fruit contain it. Let’s look at a longer list of foods that contain this acid.

Malic acid foods include:

  • Many fruits, with apples the richest source. Other fruits include cherries, grapes, blackberries, lychee, mango, nectarines, strawberries, oranges and lemons.
  • Vegetables, such as tomatoes, broccoli, carrots, peas, potatoes, tomatoes and rhubarb.
  • Wine and ciders (made from apples)

This acid is also commonly added to beverages, including powdered iced tea and fruit-flavored drinks. It can also be found in fruit preserves, chewing gum, hard and soft candies, as well as some baked goods.

The list continues with personal care products toothpaste, mouth washes, cough syrups and throat lozenges.

What to Look for in Malic Acid Products

If you’re considering a supplemental version of this acid, look for L-malic acid rather than DL-malic acid.

What’s the difference between L-malic acid and DL-malic acid?

L-malic acid is the naturally occurring form, whereas a mixture of L- and D-malic acid is produced synthetically.

An example of a malic acid supplement is malic acid powder, which can be added to water or another beverage. Another is magnesium malate, which is a supplement that combines this acid with magnesium.

Some research suggests that this malic acid magnesium combination may help people suffering with fibromyalgia.

Supplement Dosage and Preparation

If you’re wondering where to buy malic acid supplements, you can find them in health stores and online.

There is currently no standard malic acid dosage for any health concern. Check with your health care provider before taking it as a supplement.

One dose that has been studied is for dry mouth. A mouth spray containing 1 percent malic acid (as well as 10 percent xylitol and 0.05 percent fluoride) can be used as needed daily for two weeks.

Is malic acid soluble in water?

Yes, it is, and it’s important to combine the powdered supplement form with a liquid water because pure malic acid as a dry powder can irritate the skin or damage the eyes if there is contact. Breathing in the powder can also negatively affect breathing.

Final Thoughts

  • Malic acid taste is sour or tart. The highest natural source is apples, but it’s also found in numerous fruits and vegetables as well as wines and ciders.
  • This acid is added to food as both a flavoring and preservative, as well as to cosmetic products as preservative and pH buffer.
  • What is the function of malic acid? In the human body, it’s created during the Krebs cycle, which is an energy-generating process that is vital to humans and all living organisms.
  • Benefits of malic acid may include healthy energy levels, better iron absorption, skin improvements and better oral health. You can look for skin care products that contain this alpha hydroxy acid (AHA).
  • Some people take magnesium malate as a form of alternative therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, but research is ongoing as to whether or not this is helpful.
  • It is best to obtain this acid from a healthy diet, and it’s not hard to do that since so many healthy fruits and vegetables contain it.
  • Check with your health care provider before supplementing with it.

Source: https://draxe.com/nutrition/malic-acid-benefits/

Malic Acid | What Is It, Benefits, Side Effects & Uses

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

Malic acid is synonymous with apples. There is a reason that they say an apple a day keeps the doctor away, and malic acid may just be it. It is an organic compound found in many fruits, but most notably in apples. It has been known to reduce symptoms of pain and gastrointestinal problems, increase energy and improve people’s tolerance to exercise.

Where Can You Find Malic Acid?

Fruit is the foremost natural source of malic acid. It is an alpha-hydroxy acid, which is a type of chemical compounds consisting of citric acids (as in the fruits), glycolic acid (from sugar canes), lactic acid (which you’ll find in sour milk), tartaric acid (you get in grapes).

It is the sour or bitter taste that is commonly associated with certain fruits and vegetables and is used as an additive to improve taste in other foods, as well as its health benefits.

It is also found in many health and fitness supplements that are geared to reducing fatigue and increasing your threshold for exercise, along with its various other benefits.

Chances are you have not noticed malic acid as an ingredient in your mouthwash or toothpaste. One of its many uses is its ability to stimulate saliva production and reduce the population of potentially destructive bacteria in your mouth.

Benefits of Malic Acid

The most popular sporting supplements are those that naturally and safely improve your performance in terms of endurance, stamina, your ability to recover and your motivation. Malic acid is commonly found in such supplements for its capacity to ward off fatigue and boost your endurance.

What is it the doctor says about having an apple every day?

People that suffer from fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome often benefit from a healthy dose of malic acid.

This is because it helps the body to produce ATP. Often people lacking energy, or suffering one of the aforementioned conditions do not efficiently produce enough ATP.

The deficit results in fatigue throughout the day and a lack of motivation, which can considerably impact your athletic ability.

It is for this reason that using malic acid-containing sports supplements can result in a higher tolerance for exercise and greater results when taking part in endurance exercise.

When taken with magnesium supplements, it has also been found to reduce symptoms of pain, especially by patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The effects of pain relief may be experienced as early as 48 hours after taking malic acid.

As well as all of the aforementioned positives, it is notably utilized in skin care products tailored to improve and maintain healthy skin. It is praised and celebrated as a fix for wrinkles, the signs of aging in your skin, blemishes and tired-looking skin.

This isn’t the only alpha-hydroxy acid used to treat skin

AHAs are typically used to battle dry skin, moisturizing skin, and removing dead skin cells.

Because of this, it is popular for inherited diseases including ichthyosis (scaly skin) and melisma, which causes darkening of your skin.

One of the ways in which it helps with dry skin conditions is by removing the uppermost layers of dead skin cells. It is also proven to increase the thickness of the deeper layers of your skin.

It’s not just your external skin that may benefit from malic acid, either. You may treat pain and tenderness inside your mouth with it.

If you are familiar with skin care products and related supplements, malic acid is one of the ingredients that you will find that promoted the production of collagen, a type of protein associated with the strength and suppleness of your skin.

Side Effects

It’s generally considered safe, given that it is found in many fruits that you regularly ingest.

Gastrointestinal problems, bloating and cramps are listed as the most commonly known side effects of malic acid. If you experience these side effects, you should, first of all, seek professional medical advice. Hydration is a recurring cause of these symptoms and so it is recommended that you accordingly increase the amount of water you consume along with any increase in malic acid.

Pure malic acid can irritate your skin and eyes if it comes in direct contact. Little in the way of research is available, but other short-term side effects are given as nausea, diarrhea and headaches, which are usually linked to dehydration.

Our articles should be used for informational and educational purposes only and are not intended to be taken as medical advice. If you’re concerned, consult a health professional before taking dietary supplements or introducing any major changes to your diet.

Source: https://us.myprotein.com/thezone/supplements/malic-acid-what-is-it-benefits-side-effects-uses/

MALIC ACID

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects
Overview Malic acid is a chemical found in certain fruits and wines. It is sometimes used as medicine. Malic acid is used most commonly for dry mouth. It is also used for fibromyalgia, fatigue, and skin conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

In foods, malic acid is used as a flavoring agent to give food a tart taste. In manufacturing, malic acid is used to adjust the acidity of cosmetics. Malic acid is involved in the Krebs cycle. This is a process the body uses to make energy. Malic acid is sour and acidic.

This helps to clear away dead skin cells when applied to the skin. Its sourness also helps to make more saliva to help with dry mouth. Uses

  • Dry mouth. Using a mouth spray containing a malic acid seems to improve symptoms of dry mouth better than using a saline mouth spray.
  • Acne. Early research shows that applying an alpha hydroxy acid cream containing malic acid helps reduce signs of acne in some people.
  • Fibromyalgia. Taking malic acid in combination with magnesium seems to reduce pain and tenderness caused by fibromyalgia.
  • Fatigue.
  • Warts.
  • Scaly, itchy skin (psoriasis).
  • Aging skin.
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of malic acid for these uses. Side Effects When taken by mouth: Malic acid is LY SAFE when taken by mouth in food amounts. Malic acid is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine.

When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if malic acid is safe. It might cause side effects such as skin and eye irritation.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Malic acid is LY SAFE when taken by mouth in food amounts. There isn't enough reliable information to know if malic acid is safe to use as medicine when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid in amounts greater than what is normally found in food.

Low blood pressure: Malic acid might lower blood pressure. In theory, malic acid might increase the risk of blood pressure becoming too low in people prone to low blood pressure.

Interactions Dosing

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

ADULTS

SPRAYED IN MOUTH:

  • For dry mouth: Mouth sprays containing 1% malic acid alone or with 10% xylitol, and 0.05% fluoride have been used up to 8 times daily for 2 weeks.

View References

  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 184 – Direct Food Substances Affirmed as Generally Recognized as Safe. Available at: http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=786bafc6f6343634f79fcdca7061e1&rgn=div5&view=text&node=21:3.0.1.1.14&idno=21#se21.3.184_11069.
  • Fiume, Z. Final report on the safety assessment of malic acid and sodium malate. Int J Toxicol 2001;20 Suppl 1:47-55. View abstract.
  • Gardner WH. “Chapter 5: Acidulants in food processing.” CRC Handbook of Food Additives, Second Edition, Volume 1. Ed. Furia TE. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press LLC, 1968.
  • Jensen WB. The origin of the names malic, maleic, and malonic acid. J Chem Educ 2007;84(6):924.
  • Kelebek H, Selli S, Canbas A. Cabaroglu T. HPLC determination of organic acids, sugars, phenolic compositions and antioxidant capacity of orange juice and orange wine made from a Turkish cv. Kozan. Microchem J 2009;91(2):187-192.
  • Saleem R, Ahmad M, Naz A, et al. Hypotensive and toxicological study of citric acid and other constituents from Tagetes patula roots. Arch Pharm Res 2004;27(10):1037-42. View abstract.
  • Amended Safety Assessment of Malic Acid and Sodium Malate as Used in Cosmetics. Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel. Updated May 19, 2017. http://www.cir-safety.org/sites/default/files/malic%20acid.pdf. Accessed January 24, 2018.
  • Baldo A, Bezzola P, Curatolo S, Florio T, Lo Guzzo G, Lo Presti M, Sala GP, Serra F, Tonin E, Pellicano M, Pimpinelli N. Efficacy of an alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA)-based cream, even in monotherapy, in patients with mild-moderate acne. G Ital Dermatol Venereol. 2010 Jun;145(3):319-22. View abstract.
  • Bardellini E, Amadori F, Conti G, Veneri F, Majorana A. Effectiveness of a spray containing 1% malic acid in patients with xerostomia induced by graft-versus-host disease. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2019;24(2):e190-e194. View abstract.
  • CFR – Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 SUBCHAPTER B. 184.1069 Malic Acid. Food and Drug Administration Department Of Health And Human Services. Updated April 1, 2017. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=184.1069. Accessed January 23, 2018.
  • Chiriac A, Brzezinski P. Topical malic acid in combination with citric acid: an option to treat recalcitrant warts. Dermatol Ther. 2015;28(6):336-8. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 184 – Direct Food Substances Affirmed as Generally Recognized as Safe. Available at: http://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?c=ecfr&sid=786bafc6f6343634f79fcdca7061e1&rgn=div5&view=text&node=21:3.0.1.1.14&idno=21#se21.3.184_11069.
  • Fiume, Z. Final report on the safety assessment of malic acid and sodium malate. Int J Toxicol 2001;20 Suppl 1:47-55. View abstract.
  • Gardner WH. “Chapter 5: Acidulants in food processing.” CRC Handbook of Food Additives, Second Edition, Volume 1. Ed. Furia TE. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press LLC, 1968.
  • Gómez-Moreno G, Aguilar-Salvatierra A, Guardia J, Uribe-Marioni A, Cabrera-Ayala M, Delgado-Ruiz RA, Calvo-Guirado JL. The efficacy of a topical sialogogue spray containing 1% malic acid in patients with antidepressant-induced dry mouth: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Depress Anxiety. 2013 Feb;30(2):137-42. View abstract.
  • Gómez-Moreno G, Cabrera-Ayala M, Aguilar-Salvatierra A, et al. Evaluation of the efficacy of a topical sialogogue spray containing malic acid 1% in elderly people with xerostomia: a double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Gerodontology. 2014;31(4):274-80. View abstract.
  • Gómez-Moreno G, Guardia J, Aguilar-Salvatierra A, Cabrera-Ayala M, Maté-Sánchez de-Val JE, Calvo-Guirado JL. Effectiveness of malic acid 1% in patients with xerostomia induced by antihypertensive drugs. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2013 Jan 1;18(1):e49-55. View abstract.
  • Jensen WB. The origin of the names malic, maleic, and malonic acid. J Chem Educ 2007;84(6):924.
  • Kelebek H, Selli S, Canbas A. Cabaroglu T. HPLC determination of organic acids, sugars, phenolic compositions and antioxidant capacity of orange juice and orange wine made from a Turkish cv. Kozan. Microchem J 2009;91(2):187-192.
  • Russell IJ, Michalek JE, Flechas JD, Abraham GE. Treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome with Super Malic: a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, crossover pilot study. J Rheumatol 1995;22:953-8. View abstract.
  • Saleem R, Ahmad M, Naz A, et al. Hypotensive and toxicological study of citric acid and other constituents from Tagetes patula roots. Arch Pharm Res 2004;27(10):1037-42. View abstract.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-1495/malic-acid

Malic Acid – Health Benefits, Dosage & Side Effects

Malic Acid Benefits & Uses + Side Effects

Commonly associated with apples, malic acid is a natural substance found in fruits and vegetables. It is quite beneficial for treating fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome and can have desirable effects on your oral health as well. Some studies suggest malic acid offers a few other benefits too. In this post, we will look at these benefits.

Table Of Contents

What Is Malic Acid?
What Are The Benefits Of Malic Acid?
What Are The Foods Rich In Malic Acid?
What Is The Recommended Dosage Of Malic Acid?
What Are The Side Effects Of Excess Malic Acid?

Malic acid is naturally found in fruits and vegetables and is also produced in our bodies when carbohydrates are converted into energy. The natural form of malic acid is called L-malic acid, and the one synthesized in the laboratory is called D-malic acid. Malic acid provides the sour or bitter taste commonly associated with fruits and vegetables.

It produces the chemical energy required for managing bodily discomfort, energy production, general detoxification, and oral hygiene. That is just an overview. Now let’s get to the details below.

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What Are The Benefits Of Malic Acid?

Primarily used for treating fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, malic acid is also known to boost oral health and cleanse the liver. Studies show it can also boost energy.

1. Treats Fibromyalgia And CFS

Studies have revealed that malic acid can help treat the pain associated with fibromyalgia. And it is especially effective when taken in combination with magnesium. The acid also increases tolerance to exercise, which otherwise gets difficult for people suffering from the condition. Research is also being done to check if low magnesium levels can contribute to fibromyalgia (1).

Malic acid improves overall muscle performance, and this can ease chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The acid also boosts energy levels and improves the condition.

2. Boosts Oral Health

Studies show how malic acid can improve xerostomia or dry mouth. It stimulates the production of saliva and treats the condition (2). The production of saliva also reduces the harmful bacteria in the mouth – this means malic acid can serve as an oral detox. Which is one reason it is used in toothpaste and mouthwashes.

You can also use malic acid to whiten your teeth. It acts as an astringent and removes surface discoloration. You can use strawberries for this purpose. Mash a couple of them in a bowl and add a pinch of baking soda.

Apply this mix to your toothbrush and brush for several minutes. Rinse with water right away and follow with a mouth rinse to protect the enamel. Repeat it just once every two or three months.

Don’t overdo it – as malic acid may corrode your teeth as any acid food would do.

[ Read: 5 Effective Ways To Have Good Oral Health ]

3. Improves Liver Health

Malic acid is also an effective metal chelator – which means it can bind to the toxic metals accumulated in the liver and deactivate them. Malic acid is also known for crumbling gallstones – this enables them to pass smoothly through urine, thereby cleansing the liver.

Removing gallstones in the gallbladder allows for more bile production and bile flow, and this lowers the amount of cholesterol and fat in the liver – and helps reverse fatty liver disease.

4. Can Treat Gout

Though there is less research on this, some sources suggest that malic acid can fight gout due to its anti-inflammatory properties.

5. Good During Pregnancy

Research is limited. However, one study states that malic acid present in fruits and vegetables can improve the absorption of iron – a mineral that is very important during pregnancy (3).

6. Can Aid Weight Loss

Some sources say that taking malic acid can aid fat break down by muscles. There is limited information on this, however. Please consult your doctor.

7. Can Make Your Skin Flawless

Malic acid can brighten the skin and smoothen its texture – which is one reason it is used as a common ingredient in anti-aging creams. It also acts as a humectant – it retains moisture, keeping the skin hydrated. In one study, old wounds were greatly improved after an ointment made from malic acid and petroleum jelly was applied.

The acid is also known to balance the pH of the skin. It can also remove a build-up of dead cells – and this works great in treating acne. Applying diluted apple cider vinegar to your skin and washing off after 10 minutes can help. You can do this twice or thrice a week.

Malic acid might also treat candida – although there is not enough research on this.

8. Can Boost Hair Health

Washing your hair with malic acid is known to eliminate bacteria and dandruff. It also can give your hair a nice shine. Malic acid neutralizes the pH levels of the hair follicles and removes dirt deposits stuck to the hair.

It can also prevent hair loss. Simply wash your hair with diluted apple cider vinegar (twice or thrice a week, before shampooing), which is a very good source of malic acid.

We are done with the benefits. But how can you make sure you get the benefits of malic acid regularly?

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What Are The Foods Rich In Malic Acid?

Following are foods and products rich in malic acid.

  • Fruits – Apples are the richest sources. Other fruits include bananas, cherries, grapes, lychees, mango, nectarines, oranges, and strawberries.
  • Vegetables – Vegetables rich in malic acid include broccoli, beans, carrots, peas, and potatoes.
  • Beverages – These include carbonated and non-carbonated beverages, powdered iced tea, fruit-flavored drinks, and alcoholic ciders and wine.
  • Medical And Personal Hygiene Products – These include throat lozenges and cough syrups, toothpaste, and mouthwashes.
  • Other Edibles – These include hard and soft candies, chewing gum, fruit preserves, and some bakery items with fruit fillings.

But we recommend you primarily focus on fruits and veggies for your malic acid needs. The beverages and other edibles we have mentioned are not always healthy.

Malic acid is also available as a supplement – in the powder form. You can buy it here. But how much of it can you take?

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The dosage usually ranges from 1,200 to 2,800 milligrams per day. Malic acid is usually used with magnesium, and in that case, the recommended dosage is 280 milligrams per day.

But wait, how do you know if you even need malic acid in the first place? Well, some of the most common indications include chronic conditions characterized by discomfort and fatigue.

Though exceeding the dosage doesn’t usually cause any undesirable effects, some individuals might experience side effects.

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  • Issues With Pregnancy And Breastfeeding

Though malic acid is safe, we don’t know about the safety of malic acid supplements during this period. Please consult your doctor before using them.

Though we are uncertain (due to lack of studies), some sources say that malic acid might lower blood pressure. In this case, it might cause your blood pressure to go way too low – which might be a problem if you are already on blood pressure medications. Hence, consult your doctor.

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Conclusion

Though malic acid is quite commonly found in fruits and veggies, it sure deserves your special attention. Ensure you get enough of it every day – it does good for your health.

Tell us how this post has helped you. Simply leave a comment below.

Expert’s Answers For Readers’ Questions

Is malic acid stronger than citric acid?

Yes, malic acid is stronger than citric acid. When added to food products, malic acid contributes to extreme tartness. It also is used with or in place of citric acid in sour sweets.

Is malic acid soluble in water?

Yes. In scientific terms, carboxylic acids with short carbon chains are soluble in water. Malic acid is one such acid, and hence, it is soluble in water.

Source: https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/benefits-of-malic-acid/

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