Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Contents
  1. Effexor for Depression: Facts, Side Effects, Cost, Dosing
  2. Is there a generic version of Effexor?
  3. Are there any major differences between Effexor and other mental health medications?
  4. Can children take Effexor?
  5. Are there potential interaction issues for people taking Effexor and any other drugs?
  6. Are there any other medical conditions that would make someone ineligible for Effexor therapy?
  7. What is the typical dose that would be prescribed to someone taking Effexor?
  8. What do I do if I miss a dose?
  9. How long does it take for Effexor to reach full efficacy?
  10. What side effects can Effexor cause?
  11. What are the potential psychological side effects of taking Effexor?
  12. What are the potential long-term effects of taking Effexor?
  13. Is it safe for a woman who is pregnant, about to become pregnant, or nursing to take Effexor?
  14. Can symptoms occur if Effexor is discontinued?
  15. What should I do if I overdose on Effexor?
  16. Is Effexor habit-forming?
  17. How much does Effexor cost?
  18. Are there any disadvantages to Effexor?
  19. Side Effects of Effexor (Venlafaxine Hydrochloride), Warnings, Uses
  20. What Is Effexor?
  21. What Are Side Effects of Effexor?
  22. What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Effexor?
  23. Effexor During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding
  24. Additional Information
  25. venlafaxine (Effexor, Effexor XR): Drug Facts, Side Effects
  26. Venlafaxine (Effexor) – Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions – Drugs
  27. Venlafaxine Warnings
  28. Venlafaxine Withdrawal
  29. Pregnancy and Venlafaxine
  30. Effexor Uses, Dosage & Side Effects – Drugs.com
  31. What is Effexor?
  32. Important information
  33. Before taking this medicine
  34. How should I take Effexor?
  35. What happens if I miss a dose?
  36. What happens if I overdose?
  37. What should I avoid while taking Effexor?
  38. What other drugs will affect Effexor?
  39. Further information
  40. Related questions
  41. Related treatment guides
  42. Venlafaxine (Effexor): Uses, adverse effects, and risks
  43. What are norepinephrine and serotonin?
  44. Worsening symptoms of depression
  45. Other common adverse effects

Effexor for Depression: Facts, Side Effects, Cost, Dosing

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Effexor is an antidepressant medication known as a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Effexor is used to treat depression, and the extended-release version of the medication is used to treat generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder.

Is there a generic version of Effexor?

Yes, the generic version of Effexor is known as venlafaxine and is sold in the U.S.

Are there any major differences between Effexor and other mental health medications?

Effexor is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). SNRIs work by increasing levels of serotonin and norepinephrine in the brain. The extended-release version of the medication is also prescribed to treat anxiety disorders.

If you have bipolar disorder and take an SNRI, you may be at risk for triggering a manic episode if you are not also taking a mood stabilizer.

Talk to your doctor about your specific symptoms, other health concerns, and other medications you take so they can make the best recommendation for your condition and symptoms.

Can children take Effexor?

The safety and efficacy of Effexor has not been established for children.

Are there potential interaction issues for people taking Effexor and any other drugs?

Talk to your doctor if you take MAO inhibitors. There are hundreds of drugs which are known to interact with Effexor in major, moderate, or mild ways, so let your doctor know what other medications you are taking before you begin taking the medication.

Some of these include anticoagulants, other antidepressants, anxiety medications, weight loss medications, pain medications, seizure medications, migraine medications, cimetidine, clozapine, diuretics, duloxetine, haloperidol, imipramine, indinavir, ketoconazole, linezolid, lithium, methadone, methylene blue, phentermine, ritonavir, sedatives, sibutramine, sleeping medications, tramadol, and tranquilizers.

Are there any other medical conditions that would make someone ineligible for Effexor therapy?

Talk to your doctor about other medical conditions before you take Effexor, such as heart attack, heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, seizures, liver disease, heart disease, kidney disease, or thyroid disease. Also tell your doctor if you are allergic to any medications, have a history of abusing medication, or a history of suicidal thoughts or behavior.

What is the typical dose that would be prescribed to someone taking Effexor?

Dosage will vary depending on the condition being treated and whether you are taking Effexor tablets or extended-release capsules.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

Take the dose of Effexor when you remember, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. You should never take extra doses of the medication to make up for missed doses, and you should not take more than one dose per day if you take extended-release capsules.

How long does it take for Effexor to reach full efficacy?

It may take several weeks or longer for the medication to be fully effective and for initial side effects to decrease.

What side effects can Effexor cause?

Common side effects can include:

  • nausea
  • headaches
  • diarrhea
  • dry mouth
  • restlessness
  • fatigue
  • sleepiness
  • feeling nervous
  • insomnia
  • increased sweating
  • increased blood pressure
  • sexual side effects

It also is recommended that you wait to drive or operate machinery until you know how the medication affects you. It is also recommended that people avoid alcohol and illegal drugs while on the medication, as they can worsen adverse effects. Report side effects to your doctor immediately.

Serious side effects can include rash, hives, seizures, chest pain, difficulty breathing or swallowing, irregular heartbeat, eye pain, fever, confusion, bleeding or bruising, coordination problems, muscle stiffness, hallucinations, and coma.

You can also report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or online.

What are the potential psychological side effects of taking Effexor?

A small percentage of teens and young adults who take antidepressants experience an increase in suicidal thoughts and behavior. Seek medical help if you experience these thoughts or other changes in behavior or mood.

What are the potential long-term effects of taking Effexor?

Effexor may cause angle-closure glaucoma, so talk to your doctor about the risks and about setting up an eye examination.

Is it safe for a woman who is pregnant, about to become pregnant, or nursing to take Effexor?

Birth defects and fetal harm are possible when Effexor is taken during pregnancy, but the risk is very low. The drug may be transferred via breast milk. Therefore, talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are nursing before you take Effexor.

Can symptoms occur if Effexor is discontinued?

It’s important not to discontinue use of the drug before talking with your doctor. Withdrawal symptoms of Effexor can include anxiety, agitation, vertigo, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, sleep problems, nightmares, headache, fatigue, and dry mouth.

What should I do if I overdose on Effexor?

An overdose of Effexor could be fatal, so seek immediate help or call the Poison Help Line at 1-800-222-1222 if you overdose. Overdose symptoms can include dizziness, vomiting, nausea, muscle pain, sleepiness, hot and cold spells, tingling or numbness in hands and feet, increased pupil size, seizures, changes in heartbeat, and coma.

Is Effexor habit-forming?

Effexor is not habit-forming, but it is not recommended that you discontinue use of the drug before talking with your doctor, as withdrawal symptoms can occur.

How much does Effexor cost?

According to goodrx.com, 30 capsules of 75 mg generic venlafaxine ER cost approximately $130. 30 capsules of 75 mg Effexor XR cost approximately $400.

Are there any disadvantages to Effexor?

The biggest disadvantages of Effexor are the potential side effects. Talk to your doctor about what medication is best for you.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained herein should NOT be used as a substitute for the advice of an appropriately qualified and licensed physician or other healthcare provider.

 This article mentions drugs that were FDA-approved and available at the time of publication and may not include all possible drug interactions or all FDA warnings or alerts. The author of this page explicitly does not endorse this drug or any specific treatment method.

 If you have health questions or concerns about interactions, please check with your physician or go to the FDA site for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Source: https://www.psycom.net/effexor-venlafaxine-hydrochloride

Side Effects of Effexor (Venlafaxine Hydrochloride), Warnings, Uses

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Effexor Side Effects Center

Last reviewed on RxList 1/22/2020

What Is Effexor?

Effexor (venlafaxine) is an antidepressant used for treatment of major depression. A generic version of Effexor is available.

What Are Side Effects of Effexor?

Side effects of Effexor include:

  • dizziness,
  • nervousness,
  • nausea,
  • constipation,
  • headaches,
  • anxiety,
  • insomnia,
  • strange dreams,
  • drowsiness,
  • increased sweating,
  • blurred vision,
  • dry mouth,
  • changes in appetite or weight,
  • decreased sex drive,
  • impotence,
  • difficulty having an orgasm,
  • increased blood pressure, and
  • seizures.

Abrupt discontinuation of Effexor may cause:

  • dizziness,
  • headache,
  • nausea,
  • changes in mood, or
  • changes in the sense of smell, and taste

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Effexor?

Effexor may interact with other medicines that make you sleepy such as:

  • cold or allergy medicine,
  • sedatives,
  • narcotic pain medicine,
  • sleeping pills,
  • muscle relaxers, and
  • medicine for seizures or anxiety,
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs),
  • monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs),
  • cimetidine,
  • ketoconazole,
  • linezolid,
  • lithium,
  • haloperidol,
  • risperidone,
  • tramadol,
  • L-tryptophan,
  • warfarin,
  • almotriptan,
  • frovatriptan,
  • sumatriptan,
  • naratriptan,
  • rizatriptan,
  • zolmitriptan, or
  • other antidepressants

Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use.

Effexor During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Administration of Effexor during the third trimester of pregnancy has been shown to adversely affect the fetus and lead to prolonged hospitalization and respiratory support. Effexor passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Additional Information

Our Effexor Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Learn to Spot Depression: Symptoms, Warning Signs, Medication See Slideshow Effexor Consumer Information

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: skin rash or hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain or swelling, or seeing halos around lights;
  • easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums), blood in your urine or stools, coughing up blood;
  • cough, chest tightness, trouble breathing;
  • a seizure (convulsions);
  • low sodium level –headache, confusion, slurred speech, severe weakness, vomiting, loss of coordination, feeling unsteady; or
  • severe nervous system reaction–very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling you might pass out.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea

Common side effects may include:

  • dizziness, drowsiness,
  • anxiety, feeling nervous;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • vision changes;
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • changes in weight or appetite;
  • dry mouth, yawning;
  • increased sweating; or
  • decreased sex drive, impotence, abnormal ejaculation, difficulty having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Effexor (Venlafaxine Hydrochloride)

Depression is a(n) __________ . See Answer

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Source: https://www.rxlist.com/effexor-side-effects-drug-center.htm

venlafaxine (Effexor, Effexor XR): Drug Facts, Side Effects

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

  • Migraine headache is a type of headache associated with a sensitivity to light, smells, or sounds, eye pain, severe pounding on one side of the head, and sometimes nausea and vomiting. The exact cause of migraine headaches is not known. Triggers for migraine headaches include certain foods, stress, hormonal changes, strong stimuli (loud noises), and oversleeping. Treatment guidelines for migraines include medicine, pain management, diet changes, avoiding foods that trigger migraines, staying hydrated, getting adequate sleep, and exercising regularly. Prevention of migraine triggers include getting regular exercise, drinking water daily, reducing stress, and avoiding trigger foods.
  • Depression in teenagers may be caused by many factors. Symptoms of teen depression include apathy, irresponsible behavior, sadness, sudden drop in grades, withdrawal from friends, and alcohol and drug use. Treatment of depression in adolescents may involve psychotherapy and medications.
  • Hot flashes (or flushing) is the most common symptom experienced by a woman prior to and during the early stages of menopause, and often is described as the feeling of warmth that spreads over the body, often starting at the head accompanied by sweating. In the Study of Women Across America the Nation (SWAN) women had hot flashes that lasted on average 7 1/2 years. Symptoms of hot flashes include: Flushing Excessive sweating Anxiety Palpitations Diagnosis is made by taking a patient history and, at times, blood tests. Treatment options include hormone therapy, bioidentical hormone therapy, and medications. There are non-FDA approved natural home remedies such as: Black cohosh Licorice Evening primrose oil Wild yam Dong quai Hot flashes also can be caused by other conditions. Scientific studies to prove the safety and effectiveness of these products in relieving hot flashes have not been adequately performed. Consult your health-care professional before taking any herbal supplement.
  • Anxiety is a feeling of apprehension and fear characterized by symptoms such as trouble concentrating, headaches, sleep problems, and irritability. Anxiety disorders are serious medical illnesses that affect approximately 19 million American adults. Treatment for anxiety may incorporate medications and psychotherapy.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a psychiatric condition, can develop after any catastrophic life event. Symptoms include nightmares, flashbacks, sweating, rapid heart rate, detachment, amnesia, sleep problems, irritability, and exaggerated startle response. Treatment may involve psychotherapy, group support, and medication.
  • Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) is a painful complication of shingles. Symptoms include severe pain, itchy skin, and possible weakness or paralysis of the area. There is no treatment for postherpetic neuralgia that is effective for all patients.
  • Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. It's caused by a mutation on the X chromosome. People with Fragile X syndrome suffer from physical, social, emotional, speech, language, sensory, intelligence, and learning impairments. There is no definitive treatment for Fragile X, though there are ways to minimize the symptoms.
  • Depression is an illness that involves the body, mood, and thoughts and affects the way a person eats and sleeps, the way one feels about oneself, and the way one thinks about things. The principal types of depression are major depression, dysthymia, and bipolar disease (also called manic-depressive disease).
  • Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that leads to ongoing pain symptoms. Patients can be predisposed to developing neuropathic pain who have conditions such as: diabetes, cancer, stroke, HIV, vitamin deficiencies, shingles, and multiple sclerosis. Patient history and nerve testing are used to diagnose neuropathic pain. Antidepressants, antiseizure medications, and other types of medications are used to treat neuropathic pain. Many people with neuropathic pain are able to attain some level of relief.
  • Panic attacks are sudden feelings of terror that strike without warning. These episodes can occur at any time, even during sleep. A person experiencing a panic attack may believe that he or she is having a heart attack or that death is imminent. The fear and terror that a person experiences during a panic attack are not in proportion to the true situation and may be unrelated to what is happening around them. Most people with panic attacks experience several of the following symptoms: racing heartbeat, faintness, dizziness, numbness or tingling in the hands and fingers, chills, chest pains, difficulty breathing, and a feeling of loss or control. There are several treatments for panic attacks.
  • Bipolar disorder (or manic depression) is a mental illness characterized by depression, mania, and severe mood swings. Treatment may incorporate mood-stabilizer medications, antidepressants, and psychotherapy.
  • Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are mental illnesses that share some risk factors and treatments. Symptoms of bipolar disorder include mood changes and manic and depressive episodes. Symptoms of schizophrenia include unusual behavior, delusions, and hallucinations.
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder that causes a person to suffer repeated obsessions and compulsions. Symptoms include irresistible impulses despite a person's realization that the thoughts are irrational, excessive hand washing, skin picking, lock checking, or repeatedly rearranging items. People with OCD are more ly to develop trichotillomania, muscle or vocal tics, or an eating disorder. Treatment for OCD includes psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, and medication.
  • Causes of narcolepsy, a chronic disease of the central nervous system, have not been fully determined. Some theories include abnormalities in hypocretin neurons in the brain or an autoimmune disorder. Symptoms of narcolepsy include: excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nocturnal sleep, and automatic behavior. Diagnosis of narcolepsy is a clinical evaluation, specific questionnaires, sleep logs or diaries, and the results of sleep laboratory tests. Treatments of narcolepsy symptoms include medication and lifestyle changes.
  • Schizotypal personality disorder is characterized by odd behaviors, feelings, perceptions, and ways of relating to others that interfere with one's ability to function. Medication and psychotherapy can help the sufferer to manage their symptoms.
  • Mental health is an optimal way of thinking, relating to others, and feeling. All of the diagnosable mental disorders fall under the umbrella of mental illness. Depression, anxiety, and substance-abuse disorders are common types of mental illness. Symptoms and signs of mental illness include irritability, moodiness, insomnia, headaches, and sadness. Treatment may involve psychotherapy and medication.
  • Dysthymia is a less severe form of chronic depression. Symptoms and signs include insomnia, suicidal thoughts, guilt, empty feeling, loss of energy, helplessness, sluggishness, and persistent aches and pains. Treatment may involve psychotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, and antidepressants.
  • Postpartum depression is a form of depression that occurs within a year after delivery. It is thought that rapid hormone changes after childbirth may lead to depression. Symptoms of postpartum depression include crying a lot, headaches, chest pains, eating too little or too much, sleeping too little or too much, withdrawal from friends and family, and feeling irritable, sad, hopeless, worthless, guilty, and overwhelmed. Treatment typically involves talk therapy and medication.
  • People with bulimia nervosa, an eating disorder that involves episodes of bingeing and purging, experience symptoms and signs such as deteriorating teeth, sore throat, constipation, thinning hair, and dehydration. Treatment of bulimia may involve cognitive behavior therapy, family therapy, nutritional counseling, and medication.
  • Duck syndrome is a situation initially coined at Stanford University whereby a college student may seem to be calm on the surface when actually he or she is frantically struggling to stay above water to meet the demands of student life.
  • Depression in the elderly is very common. That doesn't mean, though, it's normal. Treatment may involve antidepressants, psychotherapy, or electroconvulsive therapy.

Source: https://www.medicinenet.com/venlafaxine/article.htm

Venlafaxine (Effexor) – Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions – Drugs

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Venlafaxine, formerly sold as Effexor, is a prescription drug used to treat depression, anxiety, social phobia, and panic disorder.

The brand name Effexor has been discontinued in the United States, though Effexor XR and generic venlafaxine are available.

Venlafaxine belongs to the class of antidepressants called serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).

SNRIs work by increasing the brain's levels of serotonin and norepinephrine, neurotransmitters that act together to brighten mood and relieve pain.

Made by Pfizer, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Effexor in pill form in 1993 for the treatment of depression, and in extended-release capsules, called Effexor XR, in 1997.

It approved Effexor for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in 1999, social anxiety disorder in 2003, and for panic disorder in 2005.

The generic version of Effexor, venlafaxine, was approved in 2010.

Venlafaxine has also been prescribed off-label to treat hot flashes brought on by menopause or therapy for breast cancer; pain tied to diabetic nerve damage; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); debilitating migraines and tension-type headaches; chronic fatigue syndrome; bipolar depression; and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Venlafaxine Warnings

The FDA has issued a black-box warning for venlafaxine because studies found an increased risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in children, teenagers, and young adults taking antidepressants, including Effexor.

Venlafaxine can interact with other prescription or nonprescription medications in ways that hinder its effectiveness or bring on serious side effects.

Tell your doctor if you are taking other antidepressants, including such selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as Paxil (paroxetine) or Zoloft (sertraline), other SSNRIs such as Cymbalta (duloxetine) or Pristiq (desvenlafaxine), or any monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), including Nardil (phenelzine) or Marplan (isocarboxazid), or whether you stopped taking an MAOI within 14 days of beginning venlafaxine.

You also need to inform your healthcare provider if you take so-called tripan medications such as sumatriptan (Imitrex, Imigran) for migraines, certain painkillers such as Utram (tramadol), the antibiotic linezolid (Zyvox), or intravenous methylene blue, which is used to treat the blood disorder methemoglobinema.

These medications, along with the herbal supplement St. John's wort, raise the level of serotonin in the brain, and when taken in tandem with venlafaxine can trigger a rare but potentially life-threatening condition called serotonin syndrome.

Venlafaxine might also enhance the anti-blood-clotting effect of such blood thinners as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), as well as aspirin, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin).

Venlafaxine Withdrawal

If you stop taking venlafaxine suddenly, or reduce your dosage, withdrawal symptoms can occur, often within a matter of hours.

Venlafaxine withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Anxiety, confusion, or agitation
  • Lack of coordination or vertigo
  • Nausea, diarrhea, or vomiting
  • Sleep disorders or nightmares
  • Headache
  • Dry mouth
  • Fatigue
  • Brain zaps (electric- shocks)

Many of these symptoms can cause severe disorientation, and are especially dangerous to people driving, operating machinery, or engaging in other risky tasks.

Talk to your doctor about any unusual side effects, and follow your doctor's instructions for tapering off or stopping your use of venlafaxine.

Pregnancy and Venlafaxine

Venlafaxine may cause harm to a developing fetus.

Newborns whose mothers took venlafaxine in the last three months of pregnancy were reported to experience feeding and breathing problems, and seizures, shakes, jitters, and constant crying immediately following delivery.

For women who take antidepressants in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, there is a risk that the baby can be born prematurely, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness.

Venlafaxine does pass into breast milk, but there have been no sufficient studies to determine the risk to the infant, so talk to your doctor if you plan to breastfeed.

Source: https://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/effexor

Effexor Uses, Dosage & Side Effects – Drugs.com

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Generic Name: venlafaxine (VEN la fax een)
Brand Names:Effexor XR, Effexor

Medically reviewed by Sanjai Sinha, MD Last updated on Dec 20, 2018.

What is Effexor?

Effexor (venlafaxine) is an antidepressant belonging to a group of drugs called selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs). Venlafaxine affects chemicals in the brain that may be unbalanced in people with depression.

Venlafaxine is used to treat major depressive disorder, anxiety and panic disorder.

Important information

You should not take Effexor if you have uncontrolled narrow-angle glaucoma, or if you are being treated with methylene blue injection.

Do not use Effexor within 7 days before or 14 days after you have used a MAO inhibitor, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Stay alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Do not stop using Effexor without first talking to your doctor.

Do not give this medicine to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of a doctor. Effexor is not approved for use in children.

Before taking this medicine

You should not take Effexor if you are allergic to venlafaxine or desvenlafaxine (Pristiq).

Do not use Effexor within 7 days before or 14 days after you have used an MAO inhibitor, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine. A dangerous drug interaction could occur.

Some medicines can interact with venlafaxine and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome.

Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, or medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson's disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. Ask your doctor before making any changes in how or when you take your medications.

To make sure Effexor is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • bipolar disorder (manic depression);
  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol;
  • diabetes;
  • narrow-angle glaucoma;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • a history of seizures;
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
  • low levels of sodium in your blood; or
  • if you are switching to Effexor from another antidepressant.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits while you are using Effexor. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Effexor may cause serious lung problems in a newborn if the mother takes the medicine late in pregnancy (during the third trimester). However, you may have a relapse of depression if you stop taking your antidepressant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking Effexor. Do not start or stop taking this medicine during pregnancy without your doctor's advice.

Venlafaxine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. If venlafaxine was used successfully during your pregnancy, speak to your doctor about the risks and benefits of continuing it while breastfeeding.

Effexor is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take Effexor?

Take Effexor exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Effexor should be taken with food. Try to take this medicine at the same time each day.

Do not chew an extended-release capsule. To make the extended-release Effexor XR capsule easier to swallow, you may open the capsule and sprinkle the medicine into a small amount of applesauce. Swallow all of the mixture without chewing, and do not save any for later use.

It may take several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed. Do not stop using Effexor without first talking to your doctor. You may have unpleasant side effects if you stop taking this medicine suddenly.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often.

This medicine can cause you to have a false positive drug screening test. If you provide a urine sample for drug screening, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking venlafaxine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking Effexor?

Drinking alcohol with venlafaxine can cause side effects.

Ask your doctor before taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others. Using an NSAID with venlafaxine may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Effexor may impair your thinking or reactions. Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Your reactions could be impaired.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Effexor: skin rash or hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blurred vision, tunnel vision, eye pain or swelling, or seeing halos around lights;
  • easy bruising or bleeding (nosebleeds, bleeding gums), blood in your urine or stools, coughing up blood;
  • cough, chest tightness, trouble breathing;
  • a seizure (convulsions);
  • low sodium level – headache, confusion, slurred speech, severe weakness, vomiting, loss of coordination, feeling unsteady: or
  • severe nervous system reaction – very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling you might pass out.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea

Common Effexor side effects may include:

  • dizziness, drowsiness;
  • anxiety, feeling nervous;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • vision changes;
  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • changes in weight or appetite;
  • dry mouth, yawning;
  • increased sweating; or
  • decreased sex drive, impotence, abnormal ejaculation, or difficulty having an orgasm.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Effexor?

Taking this medicine with other drugs that make you sleepy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before taking Effexor with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Many drugs can interact with venlafaxine. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

  • any other antidepressant;
  • cimetidine;
  • St. John's wort;
  • tramadol;
  • tryptophan (sometimes called L-tryptophan);
  • a blood thinner – warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven;
  • medicine to treat mood disorders, thought disorders, or mental illness – buspirone, lithium, and many others; or
  • migraine headache medicine – sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, and others.

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with venlafaxine. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Effexor only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 15.01.

  • SSRI’s vs SNRI’s – What's the difference between them?

Medical Disclaimer

  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Autism
  • Depression
  • Bulimia
  • Postpartum Depression

Source: https://www.drugs.com/effexor.html

Venlafaxine (Effexor): Uses, adverse effects, and risks

Venlafaxine (Effexor) Uses + Side Effects

Venlafaxine, also known as Effexor, is one of the most commonly prescribed antidepressants in the United States.

It is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). It is used to treat major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders, and specifically generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

This article will look at the uses and risks associated with venlafaxine.

Here are some key points about venlafaxine. More detail is in the main article.

  • Venlafaxine is used to treat major depressive disorder and anxiety and panic disorders.
  • It is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.
  • It is used off-label to treat migraine, diabetic neuropathy, and hot flashes.
  • Adverse effects may include worsening symptoms of depression and nausea and vomiting.

Share on PinterestVenlafaxine is a commonly used antidepressant drug.

Venlafaxine is an SNRI. It works by increasing and regulating the levels of two different neurotransmitters in the brain. These are norepinephrine, also called noradrenaline, and serotonin.

At low doses, venlafaxine prevents serotonin reuptake. This means that it leaves more serotonin in the system. At higher doses, it inhibits both serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake.

What are norepinephrine and serotonin?

Norepinephrine is a stress hormone. It affects parts of the brain that relate to attention and response, and it underlies the fight-or-flight response, together with epinephrine.

It also:

  • increases the heart rate
  • triggers the release of glucose from energy stores
  • boosts blood flow to the skeletal muscles

Serotonin helps control a number of processes within the brain. These include mood and emotions, anxiety and aggression, sleep, appetite, memory, and perceptions.

Serotonin and norepinephrine are thought to play an important role in controlling people’s sense of well-being.

Venlafaxine, under the trade name Effexor, appeared on the American market in 1993, as a treatment for depression.

It is used to treat:

  • major depressive disorder
  • generalized anxiety disorder (GAD)
  • social anxiety disorder
  • panic disorder

Some doctors prescribe the drug “off-label” for:

“Off-label” means that the drug has not been approved to treat these conditions, but that physicians take responsibility for prescribing it, especially in cases where no other treatment is effective.

Venlafaxine is available:

  • as a tablet, taken two to three times a day with food
  • as an extended-release (XR) capsule, taken once a day, in the morning or evening, with food

Under the name Effexor, it is only available as the XR version. Generic versions are available in both immediate release and XR forms.

It should be taken around the same time every day.

The doctor will advise about dosage. People with liver or kidney problems will have a lower dose.

A number of studies have shown the drug to be safe and effective.

One review suggests that it is comparable to other major antidepressants in treating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and social anxiety disorder.

It is more ly to lead to nausea and vomiting than do the SSRIs.

Before taking venlafaxine, patients should discuss their medical history with their doctor to determine whether the drug is appropriate.

Worsening symptoms of depression

Patients with major depressive disorder may experience a worsening of depression, agitation and other symptoms, including thoughts of suicide, especially at the beginning of the treatment

Those caring for these patients are urged to monitor carefully for these signs and to contact a physician at once if they occur.

Other common adverse effects

Patients may experience these common side effects:

Rare side effects include:

A major depressive episode can sometimes be the first manifestation of bipolar disorder, so patients should be screened for bipolar disorder before being prescribed venlafaxine.

Not everyone can use this drug.

The patient must let the doctor know about:

  • any other conditions
  • whether or not they are or may be pregnant
  • if they are breastfeeding
  • what other drugs they use.

Seizure disorders: Venlafaxine should not be taken by patients who experience seizures.

MAOIs: People who have recently been using an older anti-depressant, known as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), such as Parnate or Nardil, should wait at least 14 days before using Venlafaxine. Interactions have led to serious adverse effects.

Allergies: Anyone who is allergic to its ingredients should not take it. These include venlafaxine hydrochloride, gelatin, titanium dioxide, hypromellose, iron oxide, ethylcellulose, and cellulose.

High blood pressure: Venlafaxine has been linked to raised blood pressure, or hypertension, in some patients, so regular monitoring of blood pressure is recommended.

Glaucoma: Anyone with a history of glaucoma should let their doctor know about this first.

Pregnancy: One study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), has suggested that pregnant women who take venlafaxine may be at a higher risk of a miscarriage, so pregnant women should only take it if absolutely necessary.

Breastfeeding: As the drug can pass into breast milk, mothers taking venlafaxine should talk to their doctor before breastfeeding.

Diet: The medication should be taken with food, but there are no specific dietary restrictions, unless a doctor advises otherwise.

Alcohol: This can add to the drowsiness that the drug can cause.

Age: Venlafaxine is not approved for use by anyone under the age of 18 years.

In those aged 18 years and under, it has been linked to weight gain and, other depressants, an increase in suicidal thinking.

However, there are very few options for treating those aged 18 years and under, so it is sometimes prescribed “off-label.”

It has been found to increase the risk of suicidal thinking, especially in children, teenagers, and young adults.

Just missing one dose may trigger dysphoria, which is a state of anxiety, depression, or unease.

A missed dose should be taken as soon as the person remembers to take it, but if it is nearly time for the next dose, they should skip the missed dose.

No more than one extended-release capsule should be taken in one day.

Taking too much can lead to the following symptoms:

  • dizziness, nausea, and vomiting
  • dilated pupils
  • muscle pain
  • feeling hot and cold
  • drowsiness
  • changes in heartbeat
  • seizures
  • coma

Other effects include tremor, vertigo, headache, hallucinations, impaired concentration, fatigue, and paresthesia, which is a sensation of pricking, tingling, or creeping on the skin.

If anyone takes too much venlafaxine, someone should call their local poison control center for advice on 1-800-222-1222. If the person collapses or stops breathing, call 911.

all medicines, venlafaxine should be stored in a locked cabinet, the reach of children.

It is important also to keep the doctor informed of any other medications, supplements, and health conditions the user might have.

People who are using venlafaxine should attend all their medical appointments, because the doctor will need to monitor for blood pressure and other signs.

If you wish to stop taking this medication, you should do so gradually and under medical supervision, because withdrawal symptoms can occur.

Any unused medication should be returned to the doctor or pharmacy.

  • Depression
  • Mental Health
  • Anxiety / Stress
  • Psychology / Psychiatry

Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263705

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