What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)? + Side Effects & Dosage

Coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone): Benefits and Side Effects

What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)? + Side Effects & Dosage

  • What is coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?
  • What brand names are available for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • Is coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral available as a generic drug?
  • Do I need a prescription for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • What are the uses for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • What are the side effects of coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • What is the dosage for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • Which drugs or supplements interact with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?
  • Is coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?
  • What else should I know about coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?

What is coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

  • Coenzyme Q10 or CoQ10 is naturally produced in the body and is present in the heart, kidney, pancreas, and liver.
  • It is a fat soluble antioxidant and an important chemical used in oxidative respiration for the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain both of which are critical for the generation of energy that is used by all cells in the body.
  • Coenzyme Q10 levels decrease with age and may be low in people with heart diseases, Parkinson's, disease, cancers, muscular dystrophies, and diabetes.

What brand names are available for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?

Acanda COQ10 Soft Gels, Doctor's Best High Absorption Coq10, Omegaboost Coq-10, Kirkland Signature CoQ10, and many others

What are the uses for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?

  • Coenzyme Q10 may be effective for treating coenzyme Q10 deficiency.
  • It is possibly effective for improving vision in people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD or ARMD); improving heart function in people with congestive heart failure; improving symptoms of diabetic neuropathy; improving immune function in people with HIV; reducing blood pressure; reducing the frequency of migraine attacks; and improving physical performance in people with muscular dystrophy.
  • Coenzyme Q10 produced in the laboratory is a component of many herbal products and has many uses.

According to the USDA, there is no difference between a “portion” and a “serving.” See Answer

What is the dosage for coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?

  • Doses vary depending on the use. The typical dose for treating coenzyme Q10 deficiency is 150 mg daily.
  • High blood pressure is treated with 120 to 200 mg daily in two divided doses.
  • The dose for preventing migraine headaches is 100 mg three times daily.
  • Doses of 300 to 2400 mg per day have been used for treating Parkinson's disease.

Which drugs or supplements interact with coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral?

Taking coenzyme Q10 with medications, herbs, or supplements that reduce blood pressure may cause too much reduction in blood pressure.

Coenzyme Q10 may help blood to clot. Therefore, it may reduce the blood thinning effect of warfarin (Coumadin).

Diet-Wrecking Foods: Smoothies, Lattes, Popcorn, and More in Pictures See Slideshow

Is coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral safe to take if I'm pregnant or breastfeeding?

Coenzyme Q10 has been used safely by pregnant women starting at 20 weeks gestation until term.

It is not known if coenzyme Q10 is excreted in breast milk.

What preparations of coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral are available?

Soft Gel Tablets: 100 and 300 mg; Capsule: 30, 50, 200, and 400 mg; Gummies: 100 mg

How should I keep coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinone, ubidecarenone)-oral stored?

Coenzyme Q10 should be stored at room temperature 20 C to 25 C (68 F to 77 F).

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Source: https://www.medicinenet.com/coenzyme_q10_ubiquinone_ubidecarenone-oral/article.htm

How Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) Affects Sperm Count and Motility

What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)? + Side Effects & Dosage

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a vitamin- substance found in body cells, especially in the heart, kidney, liver, and pancreas, that may promote health and fight some diseases. Scientists believe CoQ10 functions as an antioxidant that blocks actions that can damage cells.

Decreased sperm motility is one of the leading causes of male infertility, but there’s a noteworthy treatment option that may make a difference. Studies have found that supplements of CoQ10 can help improve sperm movement in infertile men.

According to some research, the amount of CoQ10 in the seminal fluid of men has a correlation to their sperm count and sperm motility.

What are the Effects of CoQ10 on Sperm Count and Sperm Motility?

A 2004 study in the journal Fertility & Sterility looked at the effects of a 200 mg daily CoQ10 supplement on the sperm counts of 22 infertile men with low sperm motility.

Before the start of the study, the infertile men had lower than average levels of the coenzyme Q10 in the seminal fluid. After six months of taking the supplement, the men showed increased levels on coenzyme Q10.

The research also found that the men’s sperm motility increased, as well.

This research was supported by a 2009 study, which was published in The Journal of Endocrinological Investigation. Researchers conducted two distinct studies of men with infertility, one with 22 men and the other with 60 men.

The study examined the CoQ10 concentration and distribution in patients with varicoceles and azoospermia, both before and after fertility treatments.

Researchers found that CoQ10 increased in both sperm count and sperm motility after treatment.1

While these results are promising, larger, more in-depth studies are needed. In 2013, The Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics published a meta-analysis looking at three different studies investigating CoQ10’s effectiveness as a treatment for male infertility.

They compared the results of the 149 males in the CoQ10 group with the 147 males in the placebo group.

The researchers found that, “There is no evidence in the literature that CoQ10 increases either live birth or pregnancy rates, but there is a global improvement in sperm parameters.”

Are CoQ10 Supplements Safe?

CoQ10 is sold in the United States as a dietary supplement. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate dietary supplements in the same way that it controls medications, so their safety may not be as extensively tested.

What are the Side Effects of CoQ10 Supplements?

Research has found that there are some side effects:

  • Taking 100 mg daily of CoQ10 has caused mild insomnia in some people.
  • Taking 300 mg daily for an extended amount of time may cause elevated liver enzymes.
  • Other side effects from CoQ10 may include nausea, upper abdominal pain, irritability, headache, and fatigue.

Given the improvement in overall semen analysis results after being treated with CoQ10, you should speak with you doctor about any potential benefits in improving your results and if they outweigh the potential risks and side effects

Dr. Alan Copperman is a board-certified reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist with a long history of success in treating infertility and applying fertility preservation technologies.

He serves as Medical Director of Progyny, a leading fertility benefits management company, and co-founded and serves as Medical Director of RMA of New York, one of the largest and most prestigious IVF centers in the country.  Dr.

 Copperman is also the Vice Chairman and Director of Infertility for the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Chief Medical Officer of Sema4, a health information company. Dr. Copperman has been named to New York magazine’s list of Best Doctors 17 years in a row.

He has been recognized by his peers and patient advocacy organizations for his commitment to patient-focused and data-driven care. He has published more than 100 original manuscripts and book chapters on reproductive medicine and has co-authored over 300 scientific abstracts on infertility, in vitro fertilization, egg freezing, ovum donation, and reproductive genetics. 

Source: https://progyny.com/education/male-infertility/coenzyme-q10-male-fertility/

COENZYME Q10 (AKA COQ10, VITAMIN Q, OR UBIDECARENONE)

What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)? + Side Effects & Dosage

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential compound found in every cell of the body. CoQ10 is an electron carrier in the respiratory chain, which is the ultimate pathway in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism, whereas about 95% of the energy for the body is produced.

It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. Although our bodies can manufacture CoQ10, deficiency can result from mutations in any of the 12 required genes, whereas it presents as mitochondrial disease.

Statin drugs used to lower blood cholesterol levels inhibit the biosynthesis of CoQ10. Some chronic conditions, especially those involving mitochondrial function, can increase the demand for CoQ10 in the body, leading to deficiency.

CoQ10 is generally present in only small amounts in foods, which leads many physicians to recommend supplementation. One study in children with ASD reported that significant improvements were noted using CoQ10, including in communication and social skills as well as sleeping.

However, the role of CoQ10 in the treatment of autism is mostly driven by its antioxidant properties in ameliorating an underlying metabolic, redox, or mitochondrial condition. CoQ10 is also sometimes recommended for treating a wide range of other conditions, especially heart disease and migraine.

Given the above and its tolerability (side effects are rare and mild), many expert physicians recommend CoQ10 in their patients with ASD, especially in those with signs of mitochondrial dysfunction and/or manifestations of migraine or chronic pain. The two forms of CoQ10, ubiquinone and ubiquinol, can easily be interchanged by the body.

Ubiquinone is more clinically tested form and the form present in most dietary supplements. Ubiquinol may have better absorbance from the gut, and better penetration from blood to brain, while ubiquinone may be better for migraine/pain. In Dr. Boles’ experience, each form has advantages and disadvantages and both together are recommended in many of his patients.

CoQ10 is added in order to provide a wide basis of nutrition, especially given the important role of CoQ10 in energy metabolism and the preliminary data regarding its use as a food supplement in ASD.

Ubiquinone is the form of CoQ10 provided in Spectrum Needs because ubiquinol is very-poorly absorbed from powders. Side effects are unexpected. You may wish to speak to your physician regarding supplementing you child with ubiquinol in addition to taking Spectrum Needs.

Blood levels of CoQ10 can assist in determining the correct dose for your child.

The Details

What Is Coenzyme Q10? Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a fat-soluble compound found in every cell of the body. While it is an essential compound, it can be produced in small amounts by humans, and thus is not a true vitamin.

What Does Coenzyme Q10 Do? CoQ10 is an electron acceptor in the respiratory (electron transport) chain, which is the ultimate pathway in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism, whereas about 95% of the energy (ATP) for the body is produced. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules.

What Does a Coenzyme Q10Deficiency Appear as? Biosynthesis of CoQ10 requires at least 12 enzymes, and severe CoQ10 deficiency can result from mutations in any of the corresponding genes, whereas it presents as mitochondrial disease.

Some chronic conditions, especially those involving mitochondrial function, can increase the demand for CoQ10 in the body, leading to deficiency. In addition, statin drugs used to lower blood cholesterol levels inhibit the biosynthesis of CoQ10 as well as cholesterol, from which CoQ10 is made.

CoQ10 is naturally present in essentially all foods, but generally in small amounts, which leads many physicians to recommend supplementation for certain patients.

What AboutCoenzyme Q10s Use in Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD)? The role of CoQ10 in the treatment of autism is not well studied. One open label study was conducted with 100 mg of the ubiquinol form of CoQ10 in 24 children with ASD ranging from age 3 to 6 years.

Significant improvements were noted in communication skills, playing with friends, sleeping, and food acceptance with CoQ10 plasma levels above 2.2 mg/L
(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3953391/pdf/OMCL2014-798957.pdf).

The use of CoQ10 in ASD is mostly driven by its electron transport properties in the respiratory chain, as well as in its antioxidant properties in ameliorating an underlying defect on reactive oxygen species (ROS or redox) metabolism or mitochondrial dysfunction.

Several lines of evidence support the notion that some children with ASD have abnormal redox metabolism (this topic is reviewed in https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4910649/pdf/cmped-10-2016-043.pdf), including abnormal glutathione metabolism. Oxidative damage to proteins has been documented in the brain and other tissues in ASD.

Redox abnormalities have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in children with ASD, and mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders in ASD.

Biomarkers suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction are identified in 30% or more of children with ASD, while about 5% meet strict criteria for a diagnosis of classical mitochondrial disease.

In support of this high prevalence of mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD are two studies that found lower than normal electron transport chain function in immune cells from 80% of the children with ASD examined (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21119085; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24753527).

Some of the signs that a given individual with ASD is more ly to have abnormal redox metabolism and/or mitochondrial dysfunction are the presence of chronic pain, increased fatigue on the day following unusual exertion, severe gastrointestinal disease, dysautonomia, or a history of regression (including any loss of abilities, whether transient or persistent). This list is incomplete, and you may want to consult with your physician; laboratory testing can also help. the above considerations, and low side effect profile, many physicians recommend CoQ10 in their patients with ASD, especially in those with signs of mitochondrial dysfunction and/or manifestations of migraine or chronic pain.

What About Coenzyme Q10s Use in Other Conditions? CoQ10 is sometimes recommended in individuals with heart disease and in those taking statin drugs.

Some studies have shown a benefit in preventing migraine, and the Canadian Headache Society guideline recommends that 300 mg of CoQ10 be offered as a choice for prophylaxis (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22683887).

CoQ10 is also said to boost energy and speed recovery from exercise, and to slow down some effects of aging.

What Form of CoQ10 is Best? CoQ10 comes in two forms, ubiquinone, the oxidized form, and ubiquinol, the reduced antioxidant form. Both forms can easily be processed into the other b y the body through either the loss or gain of electrons.

Ubiquinone is the original and more clinically tested form, as well as the form that is in most dietary supplements. Many people claim that ubiquinol has better gut absorption and that a much lower dose is required, but in Dr. Boles’ experience the monitoring of blood levels in his patients does not generally support this.

Ubiquinol ly has better penetration into brain, which is a good argument for the use of this form in the nutritional supplementation of individuals with ASD. However, in Dr. Boles’ unpublished experience, ubiquinone is actually superior to ubiquinol in treating migraine headache, cyclic vomiting and other forms of migraine or chronic pain.

In his practice, both ubiquinone and ubiquinol are recommended in patients with ASD and migraine, cyclic vomiting, and/or pain.

What Are the Common and/or Important Side Effects of Coenzyme Q10? CoQ10 in either form is generally very well tolerated without side effects.

Some parents complain that their children are “over energized”, which is ly a result of improved energy metabolism allowing the child to get into more mischief than before.

When this is an issue at bedtime, families have found that taking the second dose at dinner, instead of later, usually suffices.

Is There Any Laboratory Testing for Coenzyme Q10? CoQ10 may be measured in blood (plasma), and this measurement reflects dietary intake and gut absorption rather than tissue status. It is thus useful to determine whether CoQ10 supplementation is adequate.

When supplementing with CoQ10, note that the amount is usually quite low (100 mg) in most commercially-available supplements, and much higher dosages are generally required to arrive at a therapeutic level. Dosing should be discussed with your physician, who may benefit from Dr.

Boles’ typical initial dosing of 10 mg/kg/dose or 300 mg/dose (whichever is smaller) provided twice daily. Dosing is then increased until the blood level exceeds 3-4 mg/L. In addition, gel capsules provide better absorbance than powders.

Some specialized centers measure CoQ10 levels in cultured skin fibroblasts, muscle biopsies, and/or blood mononuclear cells, which are better indications of CoQ10 deficiency states, but not necessarily of substantial routine help in patient management.

What About Additional Dosing Beyond Spectrum Needs?

You may wish to speak to your physician regarding supplementing you child with ubiquinol from liquid or gel capsule formulations in addition to taking Spectrum Needs.

CoQ10 is added to Spectrum Needs in order to provide a wide basis of nutrition, especially given the important role of CoQ10 in energy metabolism. Ubiquinone is the form of CoQ10 provided in Spectrum Needs because ubiquinol is very-poorly absorbed from powders. Side effects are unexpected at the doses used in Spectrum Needs.

Formulations

SpectrumNeeds®

$77.00

Source: https://www.neuroneeds.com/active-ingredients/coenzyme-q10-also-known-as-coq10-vitamin-q-or-ubidecarenone-including-the-varieties-of-ubiquinone-and-ubiquinol/

What is COQ10 (CoenzymeQ10)?

What is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)? + Side Effects & Dosage

Coenzyme Q10, also known as CoQ10, is a type of coenzyme and natural antioxidant found in every cell in the human body. Coenzymes aid enzymes with several different bodily processes, from food digestion to muscle repair and more. Antioxidants protect the cells in your body from damage caused by harmful molecules.

Specifically, CoQ10 plays a major role in cell energy production and helps oxygen get where it needs to go in your system. With multiple benefits and uses, CoQ10 is produced by the human body, but only in certain quantities.

As we age, production of CoQ10 decreases, often resulting in hypertension (elevated or high blood pressure).

CoQ10 has been shown to help treat heart failure, aid in fertility, slow skin aging, reduce headaches, improve exercise performance, treat diabetes, prevent cancer, improve brain health, provide lung protection, and much more. Find out if it is the right supplement for you.

Benefits of CoQ10 Supplementation

Human cells need CoQ10 to function properly. CoQ10 plays a role in cell growth, maintenance, and protection, but most importantly in cell energy production.

There are over 500 published articles on the association between decreased CoQ10 levels and a variety of health conditions. Simply put: if cells lack energy, the human body may have trouble staying healthy and fighting certain conditions.

When CoQ10 levels decrease, either as a result of age or medication interactions, a number of side effects may occur.

Supplementation with CoQ10 may result in the following benefits:

  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Increased immune system support
  • Less muscle and joint pain
  • Increased energy levels
  • Lowered cholesterol
  • Improved heart health

Sources of CoQ10

As mentioned earlier, CoQ10 is made in small quantities by the human body. Supplementation with CoQ10 can be beneficial and is often necessary given certain conditions and/or advanced age.

CoQ10 can be found in the following foods, in small amounts:

  1. Fish, particularly sardines and mackerel
  2. Meats – especially beef and organ meats
  3. Spinach, broccoli, and other leafy vegetables
  4. Soy oil
  5. Peanuts

CoQ10 supplements can be found in most drug stores and pharmacies, but the quality of OTC supplements is not regulated or guaranteed.

Do I Need A CoQ10 Supplement?

CoQ10 supplementation is generally regarded as safe for healthy individuals, and may provide increased energy levels and decreased recovery time after exercise. However, if you have or are at risk for any of the following conditions, CoQ10 supplementation may be especially beneficial.

The below health conditions have been known to cause decreased or low CoQ10 levels:

  • Depression
  • Prader-Willi Syndrome
  • Male Infertility
    • Several studies have concluded that CoQ10 may improve sperm quality, activity, and concentration by increasing antioxidant protection in males with fertility issues.
  • Migraine disorders
    • Abnormal mitochondrial function can lead to an increased calcium uptake by cells, the excessive production of free radicals, and decreased antioxidant protection, which can result in low energy in the brain cells and even migraines.
    • Because CoQ10 resides in the mitochondria of the cells, it has been shown to improve mitochondrial function and help decrease the inflammation that may occur during migraines, and it further seems that it may not only treat migraines but also prevent them.
  • Peyronie’s Disease
  • Nutritional deficiencies, such as vitamin B6 deficiency
  • Genetic defects in CoQ10 synthesis or utilization
  • Increased demands by tissues as a consequence of disease
  • Mitochondrial diseases
  • Oxidative stress due to aging
  • Side effects of statin treatments

The FDA does not officially recognize CoQ10 deficiency as causal to any of the below conditions but there has been evidence of a link between them:

  • Diabetes
    • Oxidative stress can induce cell damage, which can result in metabolic diseases diabetes. CoQ10 has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and help regulate blood sugar levels.
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Heart disease/failure
    • Treatment with CoQ10 has shown to assist with restoring optimal levels of energy production, reduce oxidative damage, and improve heart function, all of which can aid the treatment of heart failure.
  • Cancers

Several preliminary clinical trials show that taking CoQ10 orally, alone or along with other antihypertensive medications significantly lowers blood pressure. In some cases, CoQ10 might support dosage reduction or discontinuation of conventional therapy.

For people with heart failure, taking CoQ10 alongside traditional treatment appears to be associated with increased heart function, improved quality of life, and decreased hospitalization rates. Additionally, several prescription medications are known to decrease or deplete CoQ10 levels. The most common of which are statins (cholesterol-lowering medications).

Taking CoQ10 may reduce the effects of statin medications, so it is important to find the right combination.

How Much CoQ10 Do I Need?

There is no official RDA (recommended daily amount) for CoQ10 supplementation. A starting dosage of 100mg daily is sufficient for most individuals.  The best way to know exactly which supplements your body needs is by taking the Vitality DNA test.

Therapeutic dosages of CoQ10 are often recommended in the following amounts:

  1. If you have a known CoQ10 deficiency, your doctor may recommend starting at a dosage of 150 mg daily.
  2. As a migraine preventative, 300 mg of CoQ10 divided into 3 separate doses may be effective.
  3. For heart failure, it may be recommended that you take 200mg daily divided into 2 doses.
  4. If you have HIV/AIDS, it may be recommended that you take 200mg of CoQ10 daily.
  5. For pre-eclampsia, it may be recommended that you take two-100mg doses after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

What are the side effects of CoQ10?

CoQ10 supplementation is associated with increased energy levels. As with other supplements that boost energy levels, CoQ10 users have reported side effects such as slight stomach upset, headaches, feeling jittery or “wired,” and experiencing mild insomnia.

 Other side effects reported less often include palpitations, anxiety, dizziness, irritability, and rarely, rashes. Increased liver enzymes have been noted with long-term supplementation of 300mg or more of CoQ10 daily, but is not associated with liver toxicity.

Studies have shown that CoQ10 can be safely used up to 30 months. Among the most common side effects of CoQ10 are insomnia, increased liver enzymes, dizziness, headaches, and heartburn. If you are taking warfarin (an anticoagulant), it is not recommended that you take CoQ10, as CoQ10 may make warfarin less effective. CoQ10 should not be used by pregnant or lactating women.

Are There Any Medications or Supplements I Shouldn’t Take With CoQ10?

In general, be aware of taking CoQ10 in with any medications, herbs, or supplements that have hypotensive effects and/or specifically treat hypertensive disorder (high blood pressure).

CoQ10 can decrease blood pressure in some individuals, so combining it with other hypotensive medications or supplements may increase the risk of adverse effects.

While CoQ10 is regarded as safe to use for up to 30 months at a time without side effects, you should be aware of the potential for information with the following medications and supplements:

Medications Interactions

  • Warfarin, or other anticoagulants

CoQ10 may cause decreased effectiveness of the above medications.

Supplement Interactions

  • Acacia gum may increase the absorption of CoQ10, which may increase the risk of side effects
  • CoQ10 may increase beta-carotene levels, which could increase the possibility of beta-carotene side effects such as skin discoloration
  • Omega-3’s are known to decrease CoQ10 levels in the bloodstream
  • This supplement has effects similar to statin medications and may decrease your CoQ10 levels.
  • CoQ10 may increase vitamin A levels, which may increase the lihood of vitamin A side effects, such as fatigue or irritability.
  • CoQ10 may increase serum levels of vitamin C, and therefore may increase the risks of side effects associated with vitamin C, such as upset stomach or headaches.
  • Taking CoQ10 with vitamin K may increase the risk of blood clots in individuals on anticoagulant medications.
  • CoQ10 may increase vitamin E levels, which may increase the lihood of side effects associated with vitamin E, such as a headache or dizziness.

Should you be supplementing with CoQ10?

There have been over 500 articles published on the association between CoQ10 supplementation and its potential health benefits. In general, CoQ10 supplementation is considered beneficial for up to 30 months at a time, usually to help increase energy levels.

There are a few groups of people that will almost certainly benefit from CoQ10 supplementation: individuals over the age of 50, those with hypertensive disorders or heart disease, and individuals with conditions that are known to deplete serum CoQ10 levels (listed above).

In summary, CoQ10 is a fat-soluble compound and antioxidant that has shown to have many health benefits, and is involved in the production of cellular energy. It is a helpful compound when it comes to preserving cells and preventing and treating chronic diseases.

Along with other uses, CoQ10 has been found to help improve heart health, regulate blood sugar, prevent cancer, and reduce the frequency of headaches and migraines.

It also has shown to reduce the oxidative damage that leads to muscle fatigue–explaining its help with athletic ability–and to reduce the damage to skin, the brain, and lungs that come with aging.

CoQ10 is a well tolerated supplement and can be found in various foods animal organs, vegetables, and legumes. People of all age can benefit from CoQ10, but adults over 50 could especially benefit as CoQ10 production decreases with age.

Whether you decide to up your intake of CoQ10-containing foods or take supplements, CoQ10 could be a great addition to your day-to-day lifestyle.

Want to know whether CoQ10 supplementation is right for you? Vitagene provides actionable intelligence about your ancestry, health traits, and helps you create healthy, lasting change in your life with diet, exercise, and supplement recommendations your DNA, lifestyle, family history, and goals.

Source: https://vitagene.com/blog/what-is-coq10/

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