What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

Contents
  1. The Ultimate Guide of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) in 2020
  2. What is Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?
  3. How Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Work?
  4. Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Help with Weight Loss?
  5. Other Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)
  6. · Minimizes Skin Aging
  7. · Promotes Healthy Nerve Function
  8. · Treats Memory Loss
  9. · Lowers Risks to Heart Disease
  10. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) vs R Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)
  11. How Much Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Should You Take?
  12. How Long Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Take to Work?
  13. What Foods Are High in Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?
  14. What Are the Side Effects of Taking Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?
  15. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Buy
  16. What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects
  17. What is Lipoic Acid?
  18. List of Important Functions for Lipoic Acid:
  19. Production of Lipoic Acid in the Human Body
  20. Antioxidant Activity
  21. Cancer Research
  22. Topics of Future Research
  23. Inflammation:
  24. Cardiovascular system:
  25. Dietary
  26. Supplemental Doses
  27. Potential Risks and Side Effects
  28. Further Reading
  29. Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300 (alpha-lipoic acid) Uses, Side Effects, Dosage & Interactions
  30. What is alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  31. What are the possible side effects of alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  32. What is the most important information I should know about alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  33. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  34. How should I take alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  35. What happens if I miss a dose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  36. What happens if I overdose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  37. What should I avoid while taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  38. What other drugs will affect alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  39. Where can I get more information (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  40. Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

The Ultimate Guide of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) in 2020

What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

Alpha-lipoic Acid refers to the naturally occurring compound that our body produces. This compound plays vital functions in our body at a cellular level. Among its main function is the production of energy.

Our body is able to produce ALA for as long as we remain healthy. But there are instances when our body won’t be able to produce enough of it especially as we age. In this case, taking Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) supplements is highly recommended.

Those who have been taking the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) supplements have claimed that it provides tons of beneficial effects, especially in treating certain conditions diabetes and HIV. It has also been found to aid in weight loss.

What is Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?

Alpha-lipoic acid or ALA is a type of organic compound that can be found in the body cells. This compound is produced within the mitochondrion, which is also considered the powerhouse of cells. It works by helping the enzymes to convert the nutrients in our body into energy.

In addition, the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) contains powerful antioxidant properties. Some other antioxidants are either fat-soluble or water but the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is both fat-soluble and water, which is why it works in each and every cell in your body.

Vitamin C, for instance, is water-soluble only while Vitamin E is fat-soluble.

The alpha-lipoic acid contains antioxidant properties that offer tons of health benefits including reduction of inflammation, lowering of the blood sugar level, improved nerve functioning and slowing down skin aging.

Although our body produces Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) naturally, it can only produce a small amount. This is the reason why many would rely on alpha-lipoic acid  supplements.

Animal products such as organ meats and red meat are some of the best sources of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA). However, plant foods tomatoes, spinach, broccoli, and Brussels also contain these compounds.

But the best way to provide a good amount of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) in your body is by taking it in the form of supplements.

The best alpha lipoic acid supplement can provide you with up to a thousand times more ALA than what you can get from food sources.

How Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Work?

The main function of the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is to prevent cell damages in the body. It also works by restoring the level of vitamins in your body, such as Vitamins C and E.

There are also pieces of evidence showing that the alpha lipoic acid neuropathy may help to improve the function of neurons for diabetes.

In addition, the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) can help to break down carbs in the body and converts them into energy.

The Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) serves as an Antioxidant and this means that it can help to protect the brain from injury or damage. Its antioxidant effects are also very useful in treating certain diseases in the liver.

Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Help with Weight Loss?

Some studies show that Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) may aid in Weight loss in various ways. Studies done on animals have proven that the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) can minimize the activity of AMPK or AMP-activated protein kinase, which is found in the hypothalamus of the brain.

If the AMPK remains active, it has the tendency to enhance hunger pangs, which could lead to overeating. By suppressing the AMPK activity, you could prevent eating more than you’re supposed to, which helps you to lose weight.

But the studies done on humans have shown that the alpha lipoic acid weight loss has only small effects. 12 studies were analyzed and it was discovered that those who are taking the alpha-lipoic acid 300 mg supplements have lost an average of 1.52 lbs. more than the group who were asked to take a placebo.

In a similar analysis, it was found that the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) did not have any significant effects on the overall waist circumference. Another analysis done on the same studies has shown that those who took the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) lost 2.8 pounds more than those who took the placebo, which is just a very small effect.

Other Benefits of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

The Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) has been known to provide tons of health benefits. Below are some of the reported Alpha lipoic acid benefits.

· Minimizes Skin Aging

Some research shows that Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) might be effective in fighting the most common signs of skin aging. In a study done on humans, a group of scientists has found that applying alpha-lipoic acid cream to the skin can help to minimize wrinkles, fine lines and rough texture on the skin.

Once the alpha lipoic acid skin cream is applied into the skin, it will penetrate deep into the skin layers and provide protection from the harmful rays of the sun. In addition, the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) may help to increase the antioxidant level in your body, including glutathione, which can effectively protect the skin from damage and minimize aging.

· Promotes Healthy Nerve Function

Research shows that Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) can help to promote the healthy functioning of the nerve.

As a matter of fact, the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) has also been found to minimize the development of carpal tunnel syndrome while still in the early stages. Such a condition can lead to tingling sensation and numbness of the hands.

In addition, taking Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) before and after undergoing surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome may help to improve the chances of recovery.

· Treats Memory Loss

One of the issues that we all have to deal with, as we grow older is Memory loss. Health experts believe that memory loss may be due to oxidative stress. Since Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is a powerful antioxidant, several studies have looked into its ability to slow down the progression of memory loss, which is a common symptom of Alzheimer’s disease.

Lab studies suggest that the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) could potentially decrease the development of Alzheimer’s by neutralizing the free radicals in the body while suppressing inflammation. However, more research is required before medical experts would recommend the ALA for the treatment of memory loss.

· Lowers Risks to Heart Disease

One of the most common causes of death around the world is heart disease. A research was done on animals, humans, and in the lab has shown that the ALA’s antioxidant properties could minimize the risk of heart diseases in many ways.

First, it allows the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) to neutralize the body’s free radicals and minimize oxidative stress, which is usually the leading cause of heart disease.

Secondly, it can help to improve the endothelial dysfunction, a condition that takes place when the blood vessels won’t be able to dilate properly, which also increases the risk of stroke and heart attack.

Because of these, some health experts believe that one of the alpha lipoic acid benefits are lowering the risk of heart diseases.

Furthermore, a review of studies has found that consumption of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) supplements could lower the bad cholesterol level on adults.

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) vs R Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

The Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is available in 3 different forms – alpha RS-lipoic acid, alpha R-lipoic acid, and alpha S-lipoic acid.

Both the Alpha RS and Alpha S lipoic are synthetics produced by means of chemical synthesis. Meanwhile, alpha R-lipoic acid is a natural form of lipoic acid. It’s the only natural version that exists and is produced by the body, while synthesized by both animals and plants.

The Lipoic Acid is considered a super antioxidant that’s capable of doing everything that an antioxidant can do, and even more. Certain types of antioxidants come only in the form of water-soluble, such as Vitamins C and E. However, the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) is both water and fat-soluble.

How Much Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Should You Take?

The Alpha-lipoic acid is available in a supplement form and you can purchase it from various health and beauty stores worldwide. You can also buy Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) online. By taking the ALA supplements, you’d be able to consume up to a thousand times more of ALA compared to eating certain foods.

It is best to consume the alpha lipoic acid supplement while your stomach is empty. Taking the alpha lipoic acid before bed is also a good idea.

That’s because there are certain foods that have the tendency to lower the supplement’s bioavailability. When it comes to the alpha lipoic acid dosage, evidence suggests that 300 – 600 mg should be sufficient.

There are instructions that you can find at the supplement’s bottle so you better refer to it when it comes to the proper dosage.

People suffering from cognitive disorders or diabetic complications might need more ALA. In this case, you must first consult with your healthcare provider on the proper alpha lipoic acid dosage that you’ll need.

How Long Does Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Take to Work?

Taking the alpha lipoic acid 600 mg orally or through IV should be enough to improve the diabetic symptoms pain, burning sensation, and numbness on your arms and legs. It could take up to five weeks of taking the supplements before you’ll notice improvement.

What Foods Are High in Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?

If you prefer to take the Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)  from food, it’s usually bonded with protein molecules from dietary sources. Here’s a list of the alpha lipoic acid foods sources.

Spinach contains 3.2 mcg per grams of lipoic acid, so eat as much of these green veggies as you can! You can have it in your soup or make it into a smoothie. But if you really love the flavor of these veggies, cook the stir-fries or add it into your favorite pasta dish.

The red meat, most especially those muscles derived from beef, is one of the best sources of Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA). It usually has 1 to 3 mcg per grams of lipoic acid. You can consume your meat braised, roasted, grilled, etc.

The heart of beef can be a great meal if you just cook it right. It contains around 1.51 g dry weight of lipoyllysine. You can slow cook it and add herbs, spices, onions, etc. Another way is to dust the heart cubes with flour before slow cooking in a stew along with some veggies.

Eating organ meats kidney is one way to get a good dose of the ALA. For instance, the kidney of beef contains 2.64 grams of lipoyllysine. You can make them into a kidney pie or cook them in any way you want.

Tomatoes are among those veggies that contain ALA, having 0.6 mcg of lipoyllysine. You can cook it in many different ways. Aside from adding on casseroles, you can also add it to pasta sauces. Tomatoes can also make for a great ingredient for salads.

The liver is another excellent source of ALA, providing around 0.86 mcg/g of lipoyllysine. You can cook it with some spices or simply add tons of caramelized onions to it.

Broccoli is another great veggie that’s considered one of the best alpha lipoic acid foods. What’s great about Broccoli is that you can cook it in many ways. You can roast, sauté, or perhaps blanch it lightly with dressing. This vegetable has 0.9 mcg/g of ALA.

What Are the Side Effects of Taking Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)?

If you show any signs of Alpha lipoic acid side effects, see your doctor immediately. Although not serious, some of the minor side effects of taking the supplements are hives, allergic reaction, difficulty in breathing, swelling of the lips, tongue, etc.

Although it’s not clear what exactly are the side effects of the ALA supplements, it is best to read the instructions carefully and follow the recommended dosage when taking the supplements.

If you suffer from any of the conditions below, stop taking the pills and see your doctor.

  • Light-headed feeling- you feel you wanted to pass out.
  • Low blood sugar- this comes with symptoms headache, weakness, fatigue, hunger, irritability, confusion, dizziness, heart palpitations, etc.

Some of the common alpha lipoic acid side effects may include the following:

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) Buy

You can now purchase the alpha-lipoic acid tablet in some vendors online. But you need to exercise due diligence because not all these vendors are legit. To ensure that you’re buying authentic supplements, take time to research and alpha lipoic acid reviews online. Don’t be tempted into buying the alpha lipoic acid supplement at a very cheap price from dubious sellers.

You should only buy from Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) manufacturer that have a good reputation. Find out what the others have to say about them by reading the alpha lipoic acid reviews. They should have more positive reviews than negative ones.

Source: https://www.wisepowder.com/alpha-lipoic-acid-ala/

What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

Lipoic acid is a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory fatty acid with a suite of essential functions, from vitamin metabolism to mitochondrial respiration. Read on to learn more about how this compound works and how to add more of it to your diet.

What is Lipoic Acid?

Lipoic acid (LA), also known as alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), R-lipoic acid, or thioctic acid, is a disulfide-containing compound [1], found inside every cell of the body [2].

Some call it the “universal antioxidant” [3].

List of Important Functions for Lipoic Acid:

  • Lipoic acid acts as a powerful antioxidant both inside and outside of the cells [1, 2].
  • Lipoic acid scavenges several reactive oxygen species (ROS) [1].
  • Lipoic acid helps to regenerate both fat and water-soluble antioxidant vitamins (such as vitamins C and E) [1, 2].
  • Lipoic acid improves sugar and fat metabolism [2].
  • Lipoic acid is an essential cofactor for mitochondrial respiratory enzymes that improves mitochondrial function [4]. Lipoic acid exerts a “rejuvenating” impact on mitochondria by protecting them against the higher levels of ROS they produce during the aging process [5].
  • Lipoic acid also has anti-inflammatory action, independently of its antioxidant activity [3].

Production of Lipoic Acid in the Human Body

A healthy body makes enough lipoic acid to supply its energy requirements; therefore, there is no daily requirement for this supplement. However, several medical conditions appear to be accompanied by low levels of lipoic acid specifically, diabetes, liver cirrhosis, and heart disease [2].

In parts of Europe, lipoic acid is approved for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. It has been shown to enhance insulin sensitivity, improve microcirculation in the limbs, and reduce neuropathic symptoms [1, 6].

Also, lipoic acid produced in the body decreases with age, which could increase free radical-induced damage. Lipoic acid supplementation in animal models has also prolonged lifespan and prevented neurological damage [3].

Antioxidant Activity

Lipoic acid neutralizes free radicals and associated oxidative cellular damage [7, 8].

Lipoic acid scavenges several reactive oxygen species (ROS) [1].

Lipoic acid also helps regenerate antioxidant vitamins C and E [1, 2].

In addition, lipoic acid promotes the activity of other antioxidants such as glutathione and coenzyme Q10, which are two essential anti-aging health-promoting compounds [9].

Lipoic acid increases tissue GSH levels, which otherwise decline with age, by restoring glutathione peroxidase activity [5].

Cancer Research

These early studies indicate that lipoic acid is suitable for further study in cancer research. They are not grounds to recommend ALA supplements to cancer patients. Many compounds seem to have “anti-cancer effects” in cell studies, but fail to do anything against cancer in animals or humans.

Cell-based and animal model studies have suggested that lipoic acid may inhibit the initiation and promotion stages of cancer [10].

ALA has also been studied for its potential effects on lung and breast cancer cells [11, 12].

Topics of Future Research

Because of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, lipoic acid is currently being investigated in the context of a variety of health conditions.

Note that many of these conditions only have a single study available, meaning that the evidence is nowhere near the vicinity of sufficient to recommend ALA for patients.

Some of the conditions are listed below.

  • Hypothyroidism: In patients with subclinical hypothyroidism, lipoic acid improved endothelial function, by decreasing oxygen-derived free radicals [13].
  • HIV infection: In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects with a history of unresponsiveness to highly active antiretroviral treatment, lipoic acid increased glutathione levels and enhanced or stabilized lymphocyte proliferation [14].
  • Cystinuria: Lipoic acid inhibited cystine stone formation in mice [15].
  • Liver Surgery: Lipoic acid reduced ischemia/reperfusion injury of the liver in humans undergoing liver surgery [16].
  • Heart Surgery: In patients with coronary heart disease and those planned for coronary artery bypass graft operation, lipoic acid significantly decreased inflammation when blood is removed from the body (extracorporeal circulation) [17].
  • High-fructose corn syrup caused pancreatic damage: Lipoic acid ameliorated metabolic changes and pancreatic lesions [18].
  • Peripheral Artery Disease: 3 months of lipoic acid supplementation improved walking tolerance and delayed pain onset in peripheral arterial disease [19].
  • Acute Coronary Syndrome: Lipoic acid ameliorated oxidative stress in patients with confirmed acute coronary syndrome (ACS) [20].
  • Takotsubo syndrome: Takotsubo syndrome is a form of stress-induced heart muscle damage. Lipoic acid improved the innervation of adrenergic nerve cells in the hearts of patients with Takotsubo syndrome [21].
  • Heart Failure: Lipoic acid prevented heart cell death [5], prevented progressive heart remodeling, and improved heart function in animal studies [5].
  • Olfactory Loss: Infections of the upper respiratory tract sometimes result in the loss of the sense of smell. Lipoic acid improves olfactory function [22].
  • Idiopathic dysgeusia: In patients with idiopathic dysgeusia, an altered perception of taste, lipoic acid was associated with significant symptomatic improvements [23].
  • Sickle Cell Disease: In patients with sickle cell disease, lipoic acid protected a subset of patients from oxidative damage to fat and proteins [24].
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: A combination of lipoic acid and d-chiro-inositol (DCI) improved clinical and metabolic health in women with polycystic ovary syndrome [25]. Supplementation of myoinositol and lipoic acid improved reproductive outcome and metabolic profiles in PCOS women undergoing in vitro fertilization [26].
  • Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: In men with chronic spinal cord injury, lipoic acid reduced fasting blood sugar, body weight, BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure. Lipoic acid also decreased food intake [27].

Inflammation:

  • Reduces both Th1 and Th2 cytokines [35].
  • Decreases TNF-α [36, 28, 5, 35, 37, 34].
  • Decreases IL-2 [35], IL-4 [35, 38], IL-1β [36] and IL-17 [35].
  • Can increase [36], but mostly decreases IL-6 [35, 39, 37].
  • Increases IL-10 [36].
  • Decreases CRP [40].
  • Decreases NO [36, 28, 30], but can also increase NO [5].
  • Decreases iNOS [30].
  • Suppresses NK cell activation [35].
  • Decreases TGF-beta [28, 38].
  • Decreases IFNγ [35, 38].
  • Decreases NF-κB [5, 34].
  • Decreases MMP-2 [28, 35] and MMP-9 [41, 35].
  • Decreases ICAM-1 [41, 35, 38, 37] and VCAM-1 [35].
  • Decreases MCP-1 (CCL2) [35, 37] and RANTES (CCL5) [37].
  • Increases heme oxygenase (HO-1, HMOX1) [37].

Cardiovascular system:

  • Decreases endothelin I [5].
  • Decreases AT1 [5].
  • Decreases PAI-1 [39].

Dietary

  • Vegetables (spinach, broccoli, tomato) [47].
  • Meat (kidney, liver, heart) [47].

Supplemental Doses

Available supplements come in doses of lipoic acid between 600 – 1,800 mg daily [9]. Studies show that increased dosage is also followed by increased side effects.

Oral lipoic acid has a limited bioavailability of about 30% [48]. Studies show that there is significant inter-subject variability in peak blood lipoic acid concentrations, due to individual differences in gut absorption [49].

Potential Risks and Side Effects

Urticaria and itching are the most common adverse events, but they are generally mild and go away on their own [4].

Lipoic acid is also associated with a dose-dependent increase in nausea, vomiting, and vertigo [50]. Higher doses of 1,200 mg and 1,800 mg have more frequent adverse effects [51]. An oral dose of 600 mg once daily appears to provide the optimum risk-to-benefit ratio [50].

This is particularly the case in the elderly population, where 600 mg dose was well tolerated, but higher doses caused intolerable flushing and intolerable upper gastrointestinal side effects. However, subjects taking gastrointestinal prophylaxis medications had no upper gastrointestinal side effects [52].

Lipoic acid (possible overdose) may cause refractory convulsions in children [53].

One study in mice suggests that prophylactic and abundant intake of lipoic acid causes fatty liver and liver injury [54]. There is one recorded case of lipoic acid causing acute cholestatic hepatitis in humans [55]. It may be prudent to monitor cholesterol and liver enzymes with long-term lipoic acid supplementation.

Finally, in rats, it was shown that lipoic acid reduces the absorption of iron. Lipoic acid supplementation could potentially trigger iron deficiency anemia [56]. No such events have been reported in humans though.

Talk to your doctor before supplementing with ALA to avoid adverse events and unexpected interactions.

Further Reading

  • Alpha-Lipoic Acid Benefits: Skin, Neuropathy, Weight & More

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Source: https://selfhacked.com/blog/lipoic-acid-dosage/

Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300 (alpha-lipoic acid) Uses, Side Effects, Dosage & Interactions

What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

  • What is alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What are the possible side effects of alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What is the most important information I should know about alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • How should I take alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What happens if I miss a dose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What happens if I overdose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What should I avoid while taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • What other drugs will affect alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?
  • Where can I get more information (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

What is alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Alpha-lipoic acid is an antioxidant also known as Acetate Replacing Factor, ALA, Biletan, Lipoicin, Thioctan, and many other names.

Alpha-lipoic acid is a naturally occurring fatty acid that can be found in many foods such as yeast, spinach, broccoli, potatoes, and organ meats such as liver or kidney.

Alpha-lipoic acid has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in weight loss, treating diabetic nerve pain, healing wounds, lowering blood sugar, improving skin discoloration caused by vitiligo, and decreasing complications of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Alpha-lipoic acid may have been combined with other plants or extracts in a specific preparation to treat these conditions.

Alpha-lipoic acid has also been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, alcoholic liver problems, altitude sickness, heart-related nerve problems, HIV-related brain problems, or eye problems caused by diabetes. However, research has shown that alpha-lipoic acid may not be effective in treating these conditions.

Other uses not proven with research have included treating glaucoma, migraine headaches, high blood pressure, heart failure, dementia, carpal tunnel syndrome, leg pain caused by sciatic nerve damage or peripheral artery disease (PAD), anti-aging of the skin, and other conditions.

It is not certain whether alpha-lipoic acid is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. Alpha-lipoic acid should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Alpha-lipoic acid is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Alpha-lipoic acid may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

What are the possible side effects of alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Although not all side effects are known, alpha-lipoic acid is thought to be possibly safe when taken as directed.

Stop taking alpha-lipoic acid and call your doctor at once if you have:

Common side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

It is not known whether alpha-lipoic acid will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether alpha-lipoic acid passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without the advice of a doctor.

How should I take alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use alpha-lipoic acid, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with alpha-lipoic acid does not improve, or if it gets worse while using this product.

Do not use different forms (tablets and capsules) of alpha-lipoic acid at the same time without medical advice. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough? See Slideshow

What happens if I miss a dose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra alpha-lipoic acid to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Avoid using alpha-lipoic acid together with other herbal/health supplements that can also lower your blood sugar. This includes devil's claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, psyllium, and Siberian ginseng.

What other drugs will affect alpha-lipoic acid (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Do not take alpha-lipoic acid without medical advice if you are using any of the following medications:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with alpha-lipoic acid, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this product guide.

Where can I get more information (Alpha Lipoic, Alpha Lipoic Acid, Alpha-Lipoic-Acid-300)?

Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive.

Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy.

Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners.

The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides.

The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2019 Cerner Multum, Inc.

Source: https://www.emedicinehealth.com/drug-alpha-lipoic_acid/article_em.htm

Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

What is Alpha-Lipoic Acid (ALA)? + Dosage & Side Effects

Alpha-lipoic acid or ALA is a naturally occurring compound that's made in the body. It serves vital functions at the cellular level, such as energy production.

As long as you're healthy, the body can produce all the ALA it needs for these purposes. Despite that fact, there has been a lot of recent interest in using ALA supplements.

Advocates of ALA make claims that range from beneficial effects for treating conditions such as diabetes and HIV to enhancing weight loss.

Research on the effects of ALA supplementation is sparse. What there is, though, does suggest some possible benefits. Here is what's known about the potential health benefits of using alpha-lipoic acid supplements.

ALA is an antioxidant. Antioxidants protect against damage to the body's cells.

There are food sources of ALA such as yeast, organ meats liver and heart, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes. However, ALA from food does not appear to produce a noticeable increase in the level of free ALA in the body.

Some people take ALA supplements with the intent to improve a variety of health conditions. Scientific evidence for the health benefit of supplemental ALA has been inconclusive.

Studies show that about 30% to 40% of the oral dose of an ALA supplement is absorbed. ALA may be better absorbed if it is taken on an empty stomach.

While studies are still sparse, there is some evidence that ALA may have at least two positive benefits for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

A few studies have suggested that alpha-lipoic acid supplements may enhance the body's ability to use its own insulin to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes.

ALA may help reduce the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy — nerve damage that can be caused by diabetes.

In Europe, ALA has been used for years to provide relief from the pain, burning, tingling, and numbing caused by diabetic neuropathy.

In particular, one large study strongly suggested that large intravenous doses of ALA were effective at relieving symptoms. But the evidence for oral doses is not as strong.

More research is needed to establish the effectiveness of oral ALA supplements for diabetic neuropathy.

ALA has been suggested as a potential aid in stopping or slowing the damage done by a variety of other health conditions from HIV to liver disease. However, much of the research is still early and evidence isn't conclusive.

There has also been recent interest in supplemental ALA for weight loss. But again, there is no evidence that ALA has any effect on weight loss in humans, and more research needs to be done.

Side effects from using ALA supplements appear to be rare and mild, such as skin rash. However, little is known about the possible effect of long-term use of ALA supplements. And there are no dosage recommendations and little data on the potential effect of large doses taken over time.

ALA should not be used without a recommendation from your doctor if you take insulin or other medications to lower blood sugar.

It's possible that it can enhance the effect of these drugs, leading to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Discuss the use of supplemental ALA with your doctor first.

Your doctor may recommend that you increase monitoring of blood sugar levels. The doctor may also want to make an adjustment in your medication.

Because no studies have been done on the effect of using ALA during pregnancy, you should not use it if pregnant. Also, there are no data about its use by children, so children should not take ALA supplements.

SOURCES:

Linus Pauling Institute: “Lipoic Acid.”

University of Maryland Medical Center: “Alpha-lipoic acid.”

UC Berkeley Wellness Letter: “Alpha Lipoic Acid.”

Drugs.com: “Alpha-Lipoic Acid.”

How Stuff Works: “Alpha Lipoic Acid and Weight Loss.”

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: “Diabetes and CAM: A Focus on Dietary Supplements.”

© 2019 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

Source: https://www.webmd.com/diet/alpha-lipoic-acid-ala

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