DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

The Best Amino Acid for Depression, Anxiety and Pain

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

Today I want to talk to you about one of the best amino acids that has really helped me manage feelings of depression, anxiety and trauma.

I write about many different helpful nutrients and supplements, and I know it can be overwhelming. 

So I want to dedicate this post to one amino acid, because I feel it’s helped me more than any other (even more than n-acetyl-cysteine). 

As soon as I realize I'm running low and have just a few capsules left, I order it immediately because it gives me so many benefits.

Even though I can live without it, I’d rather not.

Taking it every so often helps my mood and significantly improves the quality of my life. 

A subtle sense of “impending doom” starts to creep in when I’ve gone too long without it. 

If you struggle with chronic anxiety and depression, you probably know what I’m talking about.

This feeling used to be a lot worse for me. 

It felt a dark cloud was following me around all day, and I just couldn’t shake it.

It’s now gone.

And thankfully, I know exactly how to keep it away.

But life can be tough at times, and things happen.

And that’s why I’m glad I have access to DL-Phenylalanine (DLPA) whenever I need it.

It helps me get through stressful times.

It can get me a deep hole nothing else.

And if you struggle with feelings of trauma, anxiety and depression on a regular basis, it may help you too. 

What is DL-Phenylalanine (DLPA) and How Does It Work?

I first learned about phenylalanine in the book The Mood Cure by Julia Ross. 

It’s an essential amino acid that plays a key role in the proper functioning of your nervous system.

If you're deficient in phenylalanine, you can have the following symptoms:

  • Fatigue
  • Confusion
  • Memory problems
  • Decreased alertness
  • Loss of appetite

DL-Phenylalanine, or DLPA for short, is a combination of two different forms of phenylalanine – D-Phenylalanine and L- Phenylalanine.

The D and L forms of phenylalanine have different beneficial effects on your body and brain. 

L-Phenylalanine is used as a building block by your body to create a number of important proteins, hormones and neurotransmitters. 

This includes dopamine, norepinephrine and thyroid hormone – all of which are necessary for optimal brain and mental function.

Dopamine in particular is very important as it’s the main neurotransmitter that supports your attention and motivation, and plays a key role in the “reward system” of your brain.

D-Phenylalanine, on the other hand, inhibits the breakdown of endorphins.

Endorphins are pain-relieving compounds that originate within your body. 

Your brain produces and releases these natural painkillers during times of strenuous exercise, emotional stress and pain. 

But D-Phenylalanine has been shown to slow the action of enzymes that destroy these morphine- substances. By doing this, it can prolong the activity of your endorphins within your nervous system, allowing you feel better for longer (1-6). 

How It Can Help You

Together, D and L-Phenylalanine can support your brain and mental health by increasing both dopamine and endorphins levels.

My research and personal experience suggest it can help treat a number of different conditions, including:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Chronic pain conditions, such as fibromyalgia and arthritis
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Premenstrual syndrome (PMS)
  • Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • Drug withdrawal, including alcohol, opiates and psychiatric medication (antidepressants, benzodiazepines, antipsychotics).

Personally, it helped me the most with depression and anxiety, and there are several studies that show it can improve your mood.

In one study, 20 depressed patients took 200 mg of DLPA everyday. At the end of the 3-week study, 12 patients no longer had depression, and 4 patients experienced mild to moderate improvements in their mood (8). 

This makes sense considering that researchers have found that people struggling with depression often have low levels of phenylalanine, and supplementation significantly elevates their mood (9). 

In fact, one study found that DLPA is just as effective as standard antidepressants (but without side effects), and another found that people who don’t respond to common antidepressants often get significantly better when they take DLPA (10, 11). 

And even if you take medication, research shows that combining DLPA with antidepressants leads to greater increases in mood than simply taking an antidepressant alone (12).

Yet un antidepressants, you can feel the effects of DLPA quickly (within a few hours) and in some cases, it can “terminate depression within 2 to 3 days” (13).

By building up your natural endorphin production, DLPA doesn’t just help reduce physical pain – but mental pain as well.

I'm currently taking this DLPA.

When I first started taking DLPA, it was such a relief. I was so glad I had found it. 

I notice it makes me:

  • More comfortable, happy and satisfied with my life;
  • More relaxed and calmer every time I take it;
  • Less moody and irritable;
  • Less ly to take things so seriously; and
  • Less reactive to negative events and situations.

Overall, it lifts my mood and reduces emotional sensitivity. Life becomes less intense. I’m not as sensitive to the world around me. I would definitely recommend it to others who also have “sensory processing sensitivity”. 

And eventually, DLPA helped me successfully wean off multiple psychiatric medications. Along with some other supplements, it played a critical role in making the withdrawal process as smooth as possible. 

I used to take 500 mg every day. Currently, I only need 500 mg once or twice each week, mainly because neurofeedback, low-level laser therapy and EMDR have helped me so much.

Other Success Stories

I understand that you might be thinking that perhaps DLPA won’t help you it helped me.

And I can't guarantee that it will. 

But I did some digging and found a number of other people online who say that DLPA has also helped them manage or overcome their mental health issues. 

I’ve gathered their comments below and bolded anything that I can personally relate to or I have experienced while taking it:

  • “Suffering from severe post-traumatic stress, I've tried any number of natural products as the chemical cocktails handed out by conventional medicine are simply not acceptable to me. After my first dose of 1000mg DLPA, my depression lifted and trauma reactions (flashbacks and hyperviligence) significantly reduced. I've been taking this for a couple months now and there is definitely a light at the end of the tunnel. It has almost completely reversed my suicidal tendencies which were increasing regularly; they are now practically nonexistent. This product has truly saved my life.”
  • “My brain finally feels at rest and the anxiety has greatly decreased, and I can get on with my life. DLPA is my lifesaver. I will be taking this for as long as I need to.”
  • DLPA has been a huge help to me. I have type 1 bipolar and this has helped me more than anything I have ever tried. I will buy more and I also take more than 1. I take 2 to 3 a day and it calms my mind nothing else ever has.”
  • “My husband is mildly bipolar. We've decided to try to treat him naturally and phenylalanine is one of the treatments. He only takes this on an “as needed” basis, which turns out to be at least two days per week. He has other regular supplements he takes daily. This is only for “extra support” on bad days. And it really works.”
  • DLPA is a key factor in improving my anxiety, depression and ADHD more than any of the several medications I have taken over the last 10 years.”
  • “I take DLPA first thing in the morning and it literally helps me get bed, get focused and get the day going with a positive attitude.”
  • “I honestly felt a difference right away. I was suddenly happy and smiling non-stop. I truly had a sparkle in my eye and I felt talkative and social. After a few hours the feeling wore off but I still felt an inner sense of content. It has helped with feelings of anxiety as well which is a plus.”
  • “Wow, what a difference! I have been so relieved from all those false moods that I can honestly say I am happy, alive and free.”
  • “I use this daily for the treatment of mild depression. I do notice a difference while on it. I went off of it briefly and felt as if someone had let some air my balloon, just kind of deflated.”
  • “I have suffered with extreme depression and anxiety since I was 13 (I’m now 42). I have gone through many different prescription/herbal/clinical therapies, and this product has been life-changing in a very short time. This has given me energy and focus I never had, a zest for life, an ability to handle stresses. I tell my husband (who keeps mentioning what a huge difference he has noticed) that this must be how “normal” people live.”

It absolutely blows my mind that more people aren’t aware of DLPA’s incredible and diverse benefits.

Clearly, it should be a first-line treatment for depression and anxiety. 

Yet I was never told about it, and it took me years to finally discover it.

I've also taken this DLPA and it works. It's currently less expensive than others through Amazon.

Both work very well in my experience.

There are a number of other brands with good reviews, but I personally can’t vouch for them.

Make sure you get a combination of both D and L-Phenylalanine. I tried L-Phenylalanine alone once and it didn’t help me as much. 

In theory, it’s also a good idea to take it alongside Vitamin B6 and Vitamin C because they help with the conversion of phenylalanine to dopamine.

You should start with 500-750 mg each day and monitor how you feel. You will have to experiment and figure out your ideal DLPA dosage. The DLPA dosage for depression, pain or anxiety can vary. You may even need up to 1,500 mg daily.

But the benefits seem to increase over the time. The more you take it, the more you can feel it’s effects. 

Also, make sure you take it on an empty stomach. Do not take it with high-protein foods. Other amino acids (such as tryptophan) can compete with phenylalanine, and reduce its absorption and transportation across the blood-brain barrier.

Lastly, this anti-anxiety supplement includes several other natural compounds and amino acids that have helped me manage my anxiety over the years. It can also help reduce stress and anxiety, along with DL-Phenylalanine

Conclusion

Antidepressants and benzodiazepines are not your only options for depression and anxiety. 

Unfortunately, much of the so-called “science” behind mainstream psychiatric drugs is untrustworthy and fraudulent, and other safe and effective treatment options are often ignored by conventional medicine. 

DL-Phenylalanine is one of these other options.

I can’t promise it will work for everyone, but since it’s easily accessible through Amazon, it’s worth a try if you suffer from depression and anxiety. Experiment with it and listen to how you feel. 

And I have, I encourage you to use as many tools as you can to help yourself, including nutrition, supplements, exercise, neurofeedback, light therapy, etc. The list goes on and on. 

None of them have to work completely.

But all together, they can make a huge difference and change the course of your life they have mine.

Enjoy This Article? You Might Also My FREE Food Guide for Optimal Brain and Mental Health!

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Source: https://www.optimallivingdynamics.com/blog/the-best-amino-acid-for-depression-anxiety-and-pain-dlpa-phenylalanine-supplement-brain-mental-health-benefits-dosage-foods-buy-adhd-tyrosine-uses-opiate-addiction-withdrawal-dopa-mucuna

L-Phenylalanine: Benefits, Dosage & Side Effects

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

L-phenylalanine is an essential amino acid crucial to maintaining your health. Essential means that your body can’t manufacture that amino acid by itself; you have to get it from foods or supplements.

L-phenylalanine is a catalyst in the creation of tyrosine, which processes hormones. It also aids in the formation of neurotransmitters dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. In addition to its extensive role within the body, L-phenylalanine is an effective supplement for overall health and well-being.

Where Does it Come From?

If you were going to build a human body from scratch, you would use proteins to do it. Proteins build, maintain, and replace muscle and body tissue.

Amino acids are the chemical building blocks of those proteins. They play a large role in maintaining optimal function in every cell in your body. There are more than 50 amino acids, and nine of them–including phenylalanine–are essential.

Since its discovery in 1879, phenylalanine’s role in the body has been extensively studied–it turns out that this amino acid boasts some seriously impressive benefits for overall health.

Phenylalanine and Vitiligo

When the body’s pigment-producing cells die or stop functioning, it results in a condition called vitiligo. The cause of vitiligo is a mystery, though some experts consider it an autoimmune condition.

As with other autoimmune diseases, vitiligo causes the body to attack normal, healthy cells — in this case, the cells that produce skin pigment, called melanocytes.

This results in the loss of color and white patches on the skin.

But studies suggest combining phenylalanine with ultraviolet light therapy could help reduce vitiligo symptoms by improving skin pigmentation. Clinical research shows that patients taking 50 mg of phenylalanine per 50 pounds of body weight showed significant skin color improvement.

Researchers in Spain gave patients a phenylalanine supplement combined with a skin gel and regular exposure to sunlight for 30-minute intervals. At the end of the trial, participants noted a 75 percent improvement in the appearance of their vitiligo (x).

ADHD and Phenylalanine

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a brain disorder, often surfacing in children and continuing to manifest its symptoms into adulthood.

Some inattention or hyperactivity is normal in young people, but when inattention and hyperactivity are part of an ongoing, destructive pattern that interferes with normal development, it may be due to ADHD.

It is possible to treat ADHD, but there is currently no known cure.

Those with ADHD typically have lower body levels of phenylalanine, meaning supplementing with phenylalanine may help relieve symptoms. Doctors often prescribe it along with medications Ritalin or Adderall. Combining phenylalanine with traditional medications for ADHD may also help buffer symptoms of medication withdrawal (x).

Pain Relief

Step into any pharmacy and you’ll immediately find rows of medications that treat pain, but not its underlying cause–and more often than not, they come with a host of side effects. But phenylalanine could provide natural pain relief (without a mile-long list of side effects).

There are two types of phenylalanine: the first comes from the foods we eat; this form is the essential amino acid l-phenylalanine.

The second is produced synthetically in a lab–this form is called d-phenylalanine.

Combing the two forms creates a power-packed compound called DLPA (Dextro-Levo-Phenyl-Alanine), which is used to treat chronic pain that doesn’t respond to traditional pain relievers or other natural remedies.

Most painkillers require a higher dosage over time, but DLPA is the opposite–over time, you’ll need less of it to relieve pain. And since DLPA breaks down into phenylalanine, it can help boost your body’s levels of natural phenylalanine. The biochemical result? DLPA seems to assist the body’s inner system of relieving its own pain (x).

Boosts Mood

Because of its role in dopamine production, phenylalanine could help relieve depression and boost mood (x). Dopamine is a type of chemical and hormone known as a neurotransmitter that helps regulate your mood.

When your brain produces healthy amounts of dopamine, you feel hopeful, optimistic, and happy, but without balanced dopamine levels, you may notice symptoms fatigue, depression, weight gain and addictive behaviors.

So where does phenylalanine come into play? Here’s how it works: your body converts phenylalanine into tyrosine, another amino acid that aids in dopamine production, ensuring you get a healthy dose of “feel good” hormones daily.

Many people supplementing with phenylalanine have reported decreased symptoms of depression. In one study, twenty patients with depression took 200 mg of phenylalanine as DLPA every day. At the end of the three-week study, twelve patients reported their depression symptoms had completely disappeared, and four patients experienced mild to moderate improvements in their mood (x).

If you’re struggling with depression, always talk to your doctor before taking any medications or supplements.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that usually surfaces in those over the age of 40.

It’s a brain disorder that affects the dopamine-generating neurons in a certain area of the brain.

Symptoms progress slowly and uniquely with each person, but in most cases, Parkinson’s disease affects motor control and often causes depression, sleep disorders and cognitive impairment.

See Also

Studies using d-phenylalanine (the lab-created form of l-phenylalanine) have shown that it may improve tremors in people suffering from Parkinson’s (x). However, phenylalanine can interfere with another Parkinson’s medication, Levodopa, so avoid taking the two together (x).

Other Benefits

Though research is ongoing, in studies, phenylalanine has shown promise as a treatment for:

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Alcohol withdrawal symptoms
  • Appetite suppressant & weight loss

L-Phenylalanine in Food

The only way to get phenylalanine is from what we take in — through food or supplements.

So, which foods are rich in phenylalanine? Soy-rich foods and soy supplements are the best plant sources, and nuts, pumpkin seeds and squash seeds also contain it. Animal proteins containing phenylalanine include eggs, meat, liver, dairy products and seafood. Lower levels of phenylalanine are also present in oats and wheat germ.

To process phenylalanine, your body requires iron, copper, and vitamins B-3, B-6 and C.

The phenylalanine-dopamine connection happens when phenylalanine is first converted into tyrosine. For a boost of tyrosine, try bananas (especially ripe ones), almonds, apples, watermelon, cherries, meat and eggs (x).

The U.S. has set a recommended daily allowance for a combination of phenylalanine and tyrosine. For adults, the recommended daily amount is 33 mg / kg body weight per day.

L-Phenylalanine Dosage

  • L-phenylalanine powder: As a dietary supplement, take 500 mg (rounded 1/8 tsp) one to three times daily between meals, or as directed by physician.
  • DL-phenylalanine powder: As a dietary supplement, take 375 mg (1/4 tsp) three or four times daily, or as directed by physician. Individual needs vary.

L-Phenylalanine Side Effects

  • Those with PKU should avoid any supplement or product containing phenylalanine.
  • The amino acids phenylalanine and tyrosine appear to aggravate symptoms of Lupus.
  • People with certain conditions should avoid using phenylalanine, including those with schizophrenia or other psychiatric problems.
  • Consult a doctor if you are pregnant, nursing or if you have high blood pressure before taking phenylalanine.

The Bottom Line

L-phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that keeps you mentally and physically healthy, benefiting everything from your mood to the appearance of your skin. It may even serve as a natural alternative to pain medications, making it one of the most versatile and powerful amino acids.

Source: https://community.bulksupplements.com/l-phenylalanine/

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage | Nature Knows

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage
Click here to view original web page at selfhacked.com

Flip and mix molecules of phenylalanine, and you’ll get DPLA: an amino acid mixture with surprising features. It may help you overcome depression, chronic pain, and the inability to focus. Read on to see if DLPA is for you and how to take it.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Phenylalanin(L-und_D-Phenylalanin)_V1.png

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) is a nutritional supplement with 2 different forms of phenylalanine in equal amounts: D- and L-phenylalanine. As you can see in the image above, they are “mirror images” of the same amino acid oriented differently in space [1].

L-phenylalanine is the active form in the human body; it builds proteins, neurotransmitters, and other crucial molecules. It’s an essential amino acid, which means we need to get it from foods such as eggs, meat, soy, nuts, and dairy [2, 3].

D-phenylalanine is the synthetic form made in the lab. Although our bodies can’t use it as a building block, it produces specific health effects [4, 5].

People take DLPA to boost energy, manage pain, balance mood, and more. Let’s see what the science and clinical evidence say about this supplement…

  • May help with depression
  • May reduce pain
  • May boost mental clarity
  • Not well studied in humans
  • Dangerous for people with phenylketonuria

L-phenylalanine builds neurotransmitters such as dopamine and noradrenaline that control mood, mental health, heart rate, and other vital functions. As a supplement, it may help with [6, 7, 8, 9, 10]:

Your body converts about ⅓ of D-phenylalanine into the L-form, while the rest has unique effects. Supplementation with D-phenylalanine can increase your natural opioids, enkephalins, and soothes inflammation. It may help with [4, 11, 12, 13]:

In theory, DLPA should deliver the combined health benefits of both forms with fewer side effects, but there’s no substantial evidence to back this up.

Your brain uses L-phenylalanine in DLPA to produce mood-boosting neurotransmitters such as dopamine and noradrenaline. Low brain levels of these chemicals often lurk behind the symptoms of depression [6, 14].

D-phenylalanine may also contribute by boosting natural opioids in the brain [15].

In a clinical trial on 40 depressed patients, DLPA (150-200 mg/day) had the same effect as an antidepressant, imipramine. However, the authors pointed to study design flaws that may have skewed the results [16].

DL-phenylalanine (75-200 mg/day for 20 days) wiped out the symptoms of depression in 12 20 patients. It offered mild to moderate benefits in 4 more patients, while it failed to affect the remaining 4 [17].

Lower doses of the same supplement (50-100 mg daily for 15 days) restored normal moodin 17 23 depressed patients who didn’t respond to standard treatment [18].

The above studies are over 40 years old and lack placebo controls. We should take their results with a grain of salt.

Doctors are struggling to manage their patients’ chronic pain. The standard painkillers only work to an extent and carry serious long-term risks [19].

D-phenylalanine – the other half of DLPA – raises the levels of our internal opioids, which relieves pain without major adverse effects [20, 21].

Although clinical trials haven’t found the same for DLPA, some doctors have reported positive results in pain management with large doses (1,500-3,000 mg daily). DLPA’s antidepressant and painkiller effects are tightly linked [22].

Bottom line? We need more evidence before proclaiming DLPA a natural painkiller.

Low dopamine is one of the triggers of ADHD. By providing L-phenylalanine for dopamine production, DLPA may help with ADHD and other attention disorders [23].

In one older analysis, 44 children with ADHD had lower blood and urine phenylalanine levels than their healthy peers. But according to a more recent study, children with ADHD have normal phenylalanine levels [24, 25].

DLPA improved the symptoms such as anger, restlessness, and poor concentration in 19 adults with ADHD. However, 3 months after the study finished, the beneficial effects disappeared [26].

D-phenylalanine had no beneficial effects on 19 hyperactive boys in another study [27].

the available research, phenylalanine does not help with ADHD symptoms [28].

L-phenylalanine may reduce food intake and boost fat burning. As a source of this amino acid, DLPA might help with weight loss, but no studies have confirmed this yet [9, 29].

Opiate dependence is a growing medical concern while the opioid epidemic was declared a public health emergency in the US in 2017 [30, 31].

By increasing the levels of internal opioids, D-phenylalanine may improve mood and help people undergoing opiate withdrawal [20, 12].

DLPA is 50% D-phenylalanine so it might deliver the same benefits, but once again, there’s no evidence to back this up.

L- and D-phenylalanine as single supplements are also safe and well-tolerated [10, 27].

L-phenylalanine may cause nausea in higher doses and interact with a drug for Parkinson’s disease, L-DOPA. The same might go for DLPA [32, 33].

Although DLPA is safe in general, there’s a massive exception to this rule!

People with a rare metabolic disorder – phenylketonuria (PKU) – are unable to process phenylalanine properly. The accumulation of this amino acid can cause brain damage and cognitive impairment in PKU patients [34, 35, 36].

These people follow a special low-protein diet to minimize the intake of phenylalanine. Obviously, they should steer clear of DLPA other phenylalanine supplements [37, 38].

Children and pregnant women should also avoid DLPA due to the lack of safety data.

Most supplements contain pills with 500-1,000 mg of DLPA. Bulk powder with 375 mg per serving is also available.

The following DLPA dosage had beneficial effects in clinical trials:

Plenty of users have reported success with depression and mood disorders, although they mostly use DPLA in combination with other supplements such as fish oil, 5-HTP, and B vitamins.

Others take it to boost mental clarity and ease chronic pain, and they report mild improvements.

On the other hand, some users experienced no benefits from DLPA supplements. The most common side effects include:

  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Nausea

In theory, DLPA should deliver additional benefits compared with L- phenylalanine, but the evidence tells a different story.

DepressionWeight lossPainAddictionADHDVitiligo
L-Phe
D-Phe
DLPA

*Phe=Phenylalanine

In summary:

  • They both combat depression
  • L-phenylalanine may help with weight loss and vitiligo
  • DLPA may help with ADD in adults

If you’re struggling with chronic pain or substance dependence, D-phenylalanine might be the best choice.

It depends on the condition, but in most cases, you can expect the first results after 2 weeks. The effects of DLPA may fade out over time, but it’s suitable for long-term use [26, 16, 18].

This section contains sponsored links, which means that we may receive a small percentage of profit from your purchase, while the price remains the same to you. The proceeds from your purchase support our research and work. Thank you for your support.

DLPA supplements contain 2 symmetric forms of phenylalanine. They provide building blocks for proteins and neurotransmitters. Weak evidence points to their benefits for depression, chronic pain, and attention disorders.

Due to its L-phenylalanine content, DLPA may cause nausea and interact with Parkinson’s disease medication.

People with phenylketonuria, children, and pregnant women should avoid DLPA.

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DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

Flip and mix molecules of phenylalanine, and you’ll get DPLA: an amino acid mixture with surprising features. Users claim it can help overcome depression, chronic pain, and attention disorders. But is this true? Read on for an evidence-based review of DLPA benefits and side effects.

What is DLPA?

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Phenylalanin(L-und_D-Phenylalanin)_V1.png

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) is a nutritional supplement with 2 different forms of phenylalanine in equal amounts: D- and L-phenylalanine. As you can see in the image above, they are “mirror images” of the same amino acid oriented differently in space [1].

L-phenylalanine is the active form in the human body; it builds proteins, neurotransmitters, and other crucial molecules. It’s an essential amino acid, which means we need to get it from foods such as eggs, meat, soy, nuts, and dairy [2, 3].

D-phenylalanine is the synthetic form made in the lab. Although our bodies can’t use it as a building block, it produces specific health effects [4, 5].

People take DLPA to boost energy, manage pain, balance mood, and more. Let’s see what the science and clinical evidence say about this supplement…

Proponents:

  • May help with depression
  • May reduce pain
  • May boost mental clarity

Skeptics:

  • Not well studied in humans
  • Dangerous for people with phenylketonuria

How Does DLPA Work?

L-phenylalanine builds neurotransmitters such as dopamine and noradrenaline that control mood, mental health, heart rate, and other vital functions [6, 7].

As a supplement, it may help with depression and skin pigmentation, while there’s insufficient evidence for its effects on weight control and attention disorders [8, 9, 10].

The body converts about ⅓ of D-phenylalanine into the L-form, while the rest remains unchanged and has unique effects. Supplementation with D-phenylalanine may increase natural opioids, enkephalins, and reduce inflammation [4, 11].

Researchers have investigated its effects on chronic pain, mental disorders, and substance dependence, but the results weren’t convincing [12, 13].

In theory, DLPA should deliver the combined health benefits of both forms with fewer side effects, but there’s no substantial evidence to back this up.

1) Depression

Your brain uses L-phenylalanine in DLPA to produce mood-boosting neurotransmitters such as dopamine and noradrenaline. Low brain levels of these chemicals often lurk behind the symptoms of depression [6, 14].

In one clinical trial with 155 depressed patients, a combination of L-phenylalanine (250 mg daily) and standard treatment was beneficial in 80-90% of the cases [8].

DLPA (150-200 mg/day) had the same effect as an antidepressant, imipramine, in 40 depressed patients. However, the authors pointed to study design flaws that may have skewed the results [15].

DL-phenylalanine (75-200 mg/day for 20 days) resolved the symptoms of depression in 12 20 patients. It offered mild to moderate benefits in four more patients, while it failed to affect the remaining four [16].

Lower doses of the same supplement (50-100 mg daily for 15 days) restored normal mood in 17 23 depressed patients who didn’t respond to standard treatment [17].

The above studies are over 40 years old and lack placebo controls. We should take their results with a large grain of salt. Further research should investigate the potential antidepressant effects of L-phenylalanine and DLPA.

Insufficient Evidence:

No valid clinical evidence supports the use of DLPA for any of the conditions in this section. Below is a summary of up-to-date animal studies, cell-based research, or low-quality clinical trials which should spark further investigation. However, you shouldn’t interpret them as supportive of any health benefit.

2) Substance Dependence

Our internal opioids don’t just block pain signals, they regulate a deep-seated reward system in our brain that makes certain things enjoyable [18].

By increasing the levels of internal opioids, D-phenylalanine may improve mood and help people undergoing opiate withdrawal. The clinical data is limited and inconclusive [19, 12].

In 20 patients struggling with alcohol withdrawal, a supplement with D-phenylalanine, 5-HTP, and glutamine greatly reduced their psychiatric symptoms and stress [13].

The effect was ly due to increased brain levels of dopamine and enkephalins.

A group of scientists observed the ability of D-phenylalanine and hydrocinnamic acid to reduce alcohol addiction in mice by recovering internal opioids [20].

DLPA is 50% D-phenylalanine so it might deliver the same benefits, but there’s no clinical evidence to back this up.

3) Weight Loss

Some people use DLPA supplements to burn fat and lose weight despite the lack of clinical data to support its efficacy.

According to a handful of small trials, L-phenylalanine may reduce food intake and support fat burning [9, 21, 22, 23, 24].

As a source of this amino acid, DLPA might have the same effects, but no studies have confirmed this yet.

4) Pain Management

D-phenylalanine – the other half of DLPA – raises the levels of our internal opioids. This led researchers to investigate its painkiller effects, but the results from clinical trials were discouraging [19, 25, 26, 27].

Some doctors have reported positive results in pain management with large doses (1,500-3,000 mg daily) of DLPA. According to them, antidepressant and painkiller effects of DLPA are tightly linked. However, we can’t draw any conclusions from these case reports [28].

Bottom line? DLPA doesn’t seem to be effective for pain management in the light of available evidence.

5) Attention Disorders

Low dopamine is one of the triggers of ADHD. In theory, phenylalanine may help with ADHD and other attention disorders by supplying dopamine [29].

In one older analysis, 44 children with ADHD had lower blood and urine phenylalanine levels than their healthy peers. But according to a more recent study, children with ADHD have normal phenylalanine levels [30, 31].

DLPA improved symptoms such as anger, restlessness, and poor concentration in 19 adults with ADHD. However, 3 months after the study finished, the beneficial effects disappeared [32].

D-phenylalanine had no beneficial effects on 19 hyperactive boys in another study. A review of clinical trials found no significant benefits of phenylalanine for ADHD [33, 34].

the available research, phenylalanine and DLPA don’t help with ADHD symptoms.

DLPA Side Effects & Safety

This list does not cover all possible side effects. Contact your doctor or pharmacist if you notice any other side effects. In the US, you may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch

Source: https://selfhacked.com/blog/dlpa-dl-phenylalanine/

DLPA (D, L Phenylalanine)

DLPA (DL-phenylalanine) Benefits, Side Effects & Dosage

What is it?

DLPA is a depression fighting mixture that combines two forms of the amino acid, phenylalanine. The L-portion of phenylalanine, found in protein-rich foods, bolsters mood-elevating chemicals in the brain, specifically dopamine and nor-epinephrine, while The “D” form of phenylalanine is made synthetically in a laboratory.

It appears to block a nervous system enzyme that amplifies pain signals. In other words, DLPA may prevent the breakdown of the brain’s natural pain relieving chemicals. This one-two punch can relieve minor episodes of depression and chronic pain syndromes.

The DLPA combo is preferable to the pure L-form, which has been associated with increases in blood pressure.

Studies show that DLPA can be an effective part of an overall program to beat the blues, increase mental alertness, improve focus and concentration and thus may be a useful supplement for individuals with attention deficit disorders. Its pain and mood elevating effects make DLPA useful for PMS and chronic pain conditions fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis.

Health Benefits
Research indicates that DLPA can be an effective part of an overall program for chronic pain and mild depression, including the mood swings of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Because of the increase in nor-epinephrine, DPLA may increase energy and mental alertness, as well as heighten the ability to focus in individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Combined with ultraviolet (UVA) light therapy, various forms of phenylalanine have also been proposed as a treatment for vitiligo, an otherwise untreatable skin condition characterized by the development of white, pigment-free patches of skin.

In one study, Parkinson’s disease patients experienced some relief from symptoms when taking DLPA. However, rigorous research into these uses is still needed.

Specifically, DLPA may help to:

•    Ease depression.
Several clinical studies have been done to examine the effect of DLPA supplements on mood. In one trial, 12 of 20 depressed men and women who took 75 to 200 mg of DLPA a day reported being free of depression after nearly three weeks of treatment, and four reported feeling somewhat better.

For relief from the blues, DLPA appears to be most effective when combined with other natural antidepressants, such as St. John’s wort or nutritional supplements SAMe (S-adenosylmethionine) and 5-HTP (hydroxytryptophan). One smart approach might be to try one of these other widely tested dietary supplements first, and then add DLPA to the mix if depression persists.

Interestingly, the combination of DLPA and St. John’s wort performs similarly to the newer, long-acting prescription antidepressant, Effexor-XR.

that drug, the supplement-herb combo raises levels of at least two mood-elevating brain chemicals: norepinephrine (from the DLPA) and serotonin (from St. John’s wort).

In addition, Effexor, DLPA suppresses appetite by promoting the release of a chemical in the body that curbs appetite for carbohydrates, a useful side effect for those who seek solace for their depression by raiding the refrigerator.

•    Allay chronic pain.

Although more research is needed, there is some evidence that DLPA can help to relieve certain types of chronic pain, including the muscle aches of fibromyalgia and persistent arthritis-related pain.

The supplement appears to block the actions of a pain-inducing protein called enkephalinase. Some scientists speculate that DLPA also helps by boosting the effectiveness of narcotics and other pain medications you might take.

Research has shown that DLPA may be a more effective pain reliever when combined with the nutritional supplement GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid), a sedating amino acid that also blocks pain signals in the brain.

Dosage Information
Special tips:
–Look for formulations that contain both the “D” and “L” forms of the amino acid phenylalanine. This combination is less ly to lead to high blood pressure than using the natural “L” form alone.

–If you have high blood pressure, start with very low amounts, such as 100 mg a day. Increase the dose slowly and only under a doctor’s supervision.

–As is the case with most dietary supplements, DLPA has not been studied in pregnant or breast-feeding women, children, or those with kidney or liver disease.

The proper dose in these groups has not been established.

•    For relief of depression: 1,000-1,500 mg a day, taken in the morning, on an emty stomach

•    For chronic pain:
Up to 1,500 mg daily, taken on an empty stomach.

•    For ADD: 1,000-1,500 mg. a day, take in the morning, one an empty stomach

Guidelines for Use
•    As with other amino acid supplements, it’s best to take DLPA on an empty stomach with water or juice about an hour before meals. High-protein foods, in particular, can interfere with proper absorption.

•    Store in a cool, dry place, such as a closet shelf, away from heat, light, and moisture. (Avoid the humid bathroom medicine cabinet.)

General Interaction

•    Because DLPA exerts its effects through the central nervous system, avoid taking it with prescription antidepressants or stimulants, unless specifically instructed to do so by your doctor.

•    Some research indicates that high doses of DLPA can exacerbate facial tics and other symptoms of tardive dyskinesia, a troubling movement disorder caused by long-term use of antipsychotic medicines. Stop taking DLPA and consult your doctor if you are concerned about a reaction you are having.

•    As with other amino acids, DLPA may interfere with the effects of levodopa, a drug commonly used to treat Parkinson’s disease. Don’t combine the two.

Possible Side Effects
•    At recommended doses, DLPA occasionally causes mild side effects, such as heartburn, nausea, or headaches. This can be prevented by taking it with a glass of water. At excessive doses (more than 1,500 mg a day), it can cause numbness, tingling, or other signs of nerve damage.

•    DLPA may have the unwanted effect of raising blood pressure, although the D, L combination form is less ly to do so than supplements containing only the “L” form of the amino acid.

Cautions
•    Use DLPA under the supervision of a doctor familiar with its use. When taken in high doses–greater than 1,500 mg a day–over prolonged periods of time, nerve damage may develop. Lower doses appear to be safe.

•    If you have high blood pressure or are prone to anxiety or panic attacks, DLPA could aggravate your condition. Let your doctor know if signs or symptoms worsen while taking DLPA.

•    Pregnant women should not take DLPA, since it has not been well studied in this group. If you are planning to become pregnant, let your doctor know.

•    If you have been diagnosed with malignant melanoma, a potentially deadly form of skin cancer, some doctors caution against taking DLPA. There has been some concern that phenylalanine could stimulate the cancer cells, although the connection, if any, remains unclear.

•    Do not take DLPA if you have phenylketonuria (PKU), a rare, inherited metabolism disorder (you would know this: everyone is tested for PKU at birth.) People with this disease lack an enzyme that converts phenylalanine to tyrosine and must follow very strict dietary guidelines to prevent toxic damage to the nervous system.

•    Even though DLPA is a potent depression fighter, it should not be used for this condition at the expense of other health-promoting strategies, such as exercise and a healthy diet.

General Drug/Nutrient Interactions

DLPA may exert it effects through the central nervous system, so avoid taking it with other antidepressants or nervous system stimulants without the supervision of a physician familiar with nutritional medicine. Because L-phenylalanine competes with other amino acids when absorbed in the body, DLPA should not be taken with protein foods.

Source: https://wholehealthchicago.com/2009/06/06/dlpa-d-l-phenylalanine/

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