Healthy In Candy Land

Caring for our health & our planet one meal at a time

   Apr 21 2011

Facing Phobias

Usually we are only required to face our fears on an occasional basis. Once in awhile. Not that often. With time in between each so that we can process our feelings and grow from the experience, right?

Not yesterday.

I had to face several of mine, all in one day. Isn’t that some sort of hard core psycho-therapy technique?

Now, will admit, these are not gut-wrenching, blood-draining fears that make me lose my you-know-what. Because I know phobias can be very real and life altering for some people. I’d say, these are more things that make me uncomfortable. Nervous. Perhaps they are an extremely mild form of phobias? I get a bit anxious, my heart rate elevates a bit, and I certainly don’t like them, but I am still able to face them and carry on with my day.

But all of these in one day? Sheesh!

To start off the day, I was working in Jace’s preschool class and it just so happend that they were having a special guest visitor. The Parrot Lady. I am not a fan of being up close to birds of any kind. Don’t get me wrong, I love birds and I think they are beautiful. I just prefer to view them from a distance. When I worked at the veterinary hospital one of our doctors treated pet birds, and all of the other technicians always made me assist him because they knew I didn’t like the winged critters. They were difficult patients and not very nice to me. The very worst thing? If one got lose and started flapping around the room! Eeek!

The Parrot Lady’s birds were all very well behaved, but she did have one fly around the room, which made me want to hide under the sensory table! Jace was much braver than I was, and let one sit on his head, he held one on his arm,

and he even fed one a treat after it did a trick.

After I composed myself from that ordeal, Jace and I headed across town to drop him off at Erik’s office so I could go to a haircut appointment. But first, we had to ride in an elevator, another fear I had to face. I am not claustrophobic, but I do have anxiety about getting stuck in an elevator. It’s never happened to me before, but I am sure it will one of these days. I think it will every time I get in one. Usually, I opt for the stairs when possible, but climbing eleven flights of stairs with a 4-year-old and limited time to do so, did not sound like a challenge I could conquer just then.

The next fear I had to face was going to get my haircut by a new-to-me stylist. I get a bit anxious about getting my haircut anyway (is it because I am a control freak and feel very out of control when it comes to haircutting?) I had finally found a stylist that I loved and had been going to for about a year and a half, and then when I called to make my appointment this time they told me “she no longer works here.” Wha??? Of course, because that always happens to me. I bucked up and saw someone knew, and survived. She did an okay job, but not as good as my former stylist. So the hunt continues.

Lastly, I decided to face another fear last night, since it was apparently the theme of the day. I don’t do much cooking with fresh herbs, except for cilantro, chives and basil, all of which I love. Everything else I use are usually dried, when I do use them. I was excited about this recipe also because it uses buckwheat instead of a form of wheat (wheatberries or farro), which is what I think a traditional recipe would use.

Buckwheat Tabbouleh (recipe adapted from Angela at Oh She Glows)

Buckwheat Tabbouleh

  • 1 cup raw buckwheat groats
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 cups fresh Italian (flat leaf) Parsley (curly would work too)
  • 1 tomato, chopped
  • 1 cucumber, seeded and chopped
  • 2 small carrots, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup fresh chives, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup vegetable broth (reserved from cooking buckwheat)
  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • salt and pepper to taste

Bring vegetable broth to a boil in a medium sized pot and add in the buckwheat groats. Reduce to simmer and cook about 15-20 minutes or until tender. Drain off any remaining liquid and reserve. Meanwhile, finely chop all the veggies and place in a large bowl. In a small bowl whisk together lemon juice, broth and oil. Add cooked buckwheat and chickpeas to veggies and pour on dressing. Mix well. Season with salt and pepper as needed (I didn’t add salt because this broth has a lot in it.). Allow to stand for about 30 minutes to let flavors develop. Makes about 5 cups.

I was a little leary of using that much parsley, but once I tasted this salad, I knew it was a nice amount. Not too much to be too overpowering, but you can definitely taste it.

It is a very nice spring-time meal and would make a great side dish for Easter dinner!

And now, I continue the theme of facing my fears and get to get up in front of 80-something people and speak tonight at the Cub Scouts annual Blue and Gold Banquet which I have been planning and working on for several months… Wish me luck!

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5 Comments

  1. Jeanette says:

    Luck!…

  2. Erik says:

    You did not seem at all nervous speaking tonight. Job well done. And the banquet itself was PERFECT! You are truly amazing.

  3. what a great blog entry. I’m sorry it has taken me this long to find this little gem about Jace. I love going to Norpoint Coop Preschool and have attended that school for 11 years now! I’m so glad you faced one of your many fears and was very proud of you for saying hi to the kiddos. Is it okay to post a link to this blog to my website? Have a great day!
    Deb, The Parrot Lady

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